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Fungal Laccases and Their Applications in Bioremediation

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      Abstract

      Laccases are blue multicopper oxidases, which catalyze the monoelectronic oxidation of a broad spectrum of substrates, for example, ortho- and para-diphenols, polyphenols, aminophenols, and aromatic or aliphatic amines, coupled with a full, four-electron reduction of O2 to H2O. Hence, they are capable of degrading lignin and are present abundantly in many white-rot fungi. Laccases decolorize and detoxify the industrial effluents and help in wastewater treatment. They act on both phenolic and nonphenolic lignin-related compounds as well as highly recalcitrant environmental pollutants, and they can be effectively used in paper and pulp industries, textile industries, xenobiotic degradation, and bioremediation and act as biosensors. Recently, laccase has been applied to nanobiotechnology, which is an increasing research field, and catalyzes electron transfer reactions without additional cofactors. Several techniques have been developed for the immobilization of biomolecule such as micropatterning, self-assembled monolayer, and layer-by-layer techniques, which immobilize laccase and preserve their enzymatic activity. In this review, we describe the fungal source of laccases and their application in environment protection.

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      Most cited references 259

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      Fungal laccases - occurrence and properties.

       Petr Baldrian (2006)
      Laccases of fungi attract considerable attention due to their possible involvement in the transformation of a wide variety of phenolic compounds including the polymeric lignin and humic substances. So far, more than a 100 enzymes have been purified from fungal cultures and characterized in terms of their biochemical and catalytic properties. Most ligninolytic fungal species produce constitutively at least one laccase isoenzyme and laccases are also dominant among ligninolytic enzymes in the soil environment. The fact that they only require molecular oxygen for catalysis makes them suitable for biotechnological applications for the transformation or immobilization of xenobiotic compounds.
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        The structure and function of fungal laccases

         C. Thurston (1994)
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          Characterization and genomic analysis of kraft lignin biodegradation by the beta-proteobacterium Cupriavidus basilensis B-8

          Background Lignin materials are abundant and among the most important potential sources for biofuel production. Development of an efficient lignin degradation process has considerable potential for the production of a variety of chemicals, including bioethanol. However, lignin degradation using current methods is inefficient. Given their immense environmental adaptability and biochemical versatility, bacterial could be used as a valuable tool for the rapid degradation of lignin. Kraft lignin (KL) is a polymer by-product of the pulp and paper industry resulting from alkaline sulfide treatment of lignocellulose, and it has been widely used for lignin-related studies. Results Beta-proteobacterium Cupriavidus basilensis B-8 isolated from erosive bamboo slips displayed substantial KL degradation capability. With initial concentrations of 0.5–6 g L-1, at least 31.3% KL could be degraded in 7 days. The maximum degradation rate was 44.4% at the initial concentration of 2 g L-1. The optimum pH and temperature for KL degradation were 7.0 and 30°C, respectively. Manganese peroxidase (MnP) and laccase (Lac) demonstrated their greatest level of activity, 1685.3 U L-1 and 815.6 U L-1, at the third and fourth days, respectively. Many small molecule intermediates were formed during the process of KL degradation, as determined using GC-MS analysis. In order to perform metabolic reconstruction of lignin degradation in this bacterium, a draft genome sequence for C. basilensis B-8 was generated. Genomic analysis focused on the catabolic potential of this bacterium against several lignin-derived compounds. These analyses together with sequence comparisons predicted the existence of three major metabolic pathways: β-ketoadipate, phenol degradation, and gentisate pathways. Conclusion These results confirmed the capability of C. basilensis B-8 to promote KL degradation. Whole genomic sequencing and systematic analysis of the C. basilensis B-8 genome identified degradation steps and intermediates from this bacterial-mediated KL degradation method. Our findings provide a theoretical basis for research into the mechanisms of lignin degradation as well as a practical basis for biofuel production using lignin materials.
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            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            Applied Microbiology Laboratory, Department of Virology, Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati 517 502, India
            Author notes
            *Buddolla Viswanath: buddolla@ 123456gmail.com and

            Academic Editor: David Ballou

            Journal
            Enzyme Res
            Enzyme Res
            ER
            Enzyme Research
            Hindawi Publishing Corporation
            2090-0406
            2090-0414
            2014
            15 May 2014
            : 2014
            4052089
            10.1155/2014/163242
            Copyright © 2014 Buddolla Viswanath et al.

            This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

            Funding
            Funded by: http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100001843 Science and Engineering Research Board
            Award ID: SR/FT/LS-144/2010
            Categories
            Review Article

            Biochemistry

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