1
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      The effect of resistance training set configuration on strength and muscular performance adaptations in male powerlifters

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of different set configurations on strength and muscular performance adaptations after an 8-week resistance training program. Twenty-four male powerlifters participated in this study and were randomly assigned to one of two resistance training groups: (1) cluster sets (CS: n = 8), (2), traditional sets (TS: n = 8), and a control group (CG: n = 8). All powerlifters were evaluated for thigh and arm circumference, upper and lower body impulsive activities, and 1 repetition maximum (1RM) in the back squat, bench press, and deadlift prior to and after the 8-week training intervention. After training, both the CS and TS groups increased arm and thigh circumferences and decreased body fat. The CS group resulted in greater increases in upper and lower body impulsive activities than the TS group, respectively. In addition, the CS and TS groups indicated similar changes in 1RM bench press, back squat, and deadlift following the 8 weeks training intervention. These results suggest that cluster sets induce adaptive changes that favor impulsive activities in powerlifters.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 31

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Progressive statistics for studies in sports medicine and exercise science.

          Statistical guidelines and expert statements are now available to assist in the analysis and reporting of studies in some biomedical disciplines. We present here a more progressive resource for sample-based studies, meta-analyses, and case studies in sports medicine and exercise science. We offer forthright advice on the following controversial or novel issues: using precision of estimation for inferences about population effects in preference to null-hypothesis testing, which is inadequate for assessing clinical or practical importance; justifying sample size via acceptable precision or confidence for clinical decisions rather than via adequate power for statistical significance; showing SD rather than SEM, to better communicate the magnitude of differences in means and nonuniformity of error; avoiding purely nonparametric analyses, which cannot provide inferences about magnitude and are unnecessary; using regression statistics in validity studies, in preference to the impractical and biased limits of agreement; making greater use of qualitative methods to enrich sample-based quantitative projects; and seeking ethics approval for public access to the depersonalized raw data of a study, to address the need for more scrutiny of research and better meta-analyses. Advice on less contentious issues includes the following: using covariates in linear models to adjust for confounders, to account for individual differences, and to identify potential mechanisms of an effect; using log transformation to deal with nonuniformity of effects and error; identifying and deleting outliers; presenting descriptive, effect, and inferential statistics in appropriate formats; and contending with bias arising from problems with sampling, assignment, blinding, measurement error, and researchers' prejudices. This article should advance the field by stimulating debate, promoting innovative approaches, and serving as a useful checklist for authors, reviewers, and editors.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: found
            Is Open Access

            Calculating and reporting effect sizes to facilitate cumulative science: a practical primer for t-tests and ANOVAs

            Effect sizes are the most important outcome of empirical studies. Most articles on effect sizes highlight their importance to communicate the practical significance of results. For scientists themselves, effect sizes are most useful because they facilitate cumulative science. Effect sizes can be used to determine the sample size for follow-up studies, or examining effects across studies. This article aims to provide a practical primer on how to calculate and report effect sizes for t-tests and ANOVA's such that effect sizes can be used in a-priori power analyses and meta-analyses. Whereas many articles about effect sizes focus on between-subjects designs and address within-subjects designs only briefly, I provide a detailed overview of the similarities and differences between within- and between-subjects designs. I suggest that some research questions in experimental psychology examine inherently intra-individual effects, which makes effect sizes that incorporate the correlation between measures the best summary of the results. Finally, a supplementary spreadsheet is provided to make it as easy as possible for researchers to incorporate effect size calculations into their workflow.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Practical Assessment of Body Composition.

              In brief: The assessment of body composition has become an important method for determining a desirable body weight of adults and athletes. Hydrostatic weighing is a popular and valid method, but it is often not feasible for the clinical setting or for mass testing; thus, anthropometry has become the preferred method. This article reviews the scientific basis for generalized body composition prediction equations and provides methods for evaluating body composition. The authors recommend using a sum of three skinfolds (triceps, chest, and subscapula for men and triceps, abdomen, and suprailium for women) and give detailed instructions for securing accurate measurements of body fat.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                hamidarazi@yahoo.com
                Journal
                Sci Rep
                Sci Rep
                Scientific Reports
                Nature Publishing Group UK (London )
                2045-2322
                12 April 2021
                12 April 2021
                2021
                : 11
                Affiliations
                [1 ]GRID grid.411872.9, ISNI 0000 0001 2087 2250, Department of Exercise Physiology, Faculty of Sport Sciences, , University of Guilan, ; P.O. Box 41635-1438, Rasht, Iran
                [2 ]GRID grid.412462.7, ISNI 0000 0000 8810 3346, Department of Physical Education and Sport Sciences, , Payame Noor University, ; Tehran, Iran
                [3 ]GRID grid.4491.8, ISNI 0000 0004 1937 116X, Faculty of Physical Education and Sport, , Charles University, ; Prague, Czechia
                Article
                87372
                10.1038/s41598-021-87372-y
                8041766
                © The Author(s) 2021

                Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

                Categories
                Article
                Custom metadata
                © The Author(s) 2021

                Uncategorized

                environmental sciences, orthopaedics, physiology

                Comments

                Comment on this article