6
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Somatic mutation-mediated evolution of herbicide resistance in the nonindigenous invasive plant hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata) : HYDRILLA SOMATIC MUTANTS and HERBICIDE RESISTANCE

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata L.f. Royle) was introduced to the surface water of Florida in the 1950s and is today one of the most serious aquatic weed problems in the USA. As a result of concerns associated with the applications of pesticides to aquatic systems, fluridone is the only USEPA-approved chemical that provides systemic control of hydrilla. After a decrease in fluridone's efficacy at controlling hydrilla, 200 Florida water bodies were sampled to determine the extent of the problem and the biological basis for the reduced efficacy. Our studies revealed that hydrilla phenotypes with two- to six-fold higher fluridone resistance were present in 20 water bodies. Since fluridone is an inhibitor of the enzyme phytoene desaturase (PDS), the gene for PDS (pds) was cloned from herbicide-susceptible and -resistant hydrilla plants. We report for the first time in higher plants three independent herbicide-resistant hydrilla biotypes arising from the selection of somatic mutations at the arginine 304 codon of pds. The three PDS variants had specific activities similar to the wild-type enzyme but were two to five times less sensitive to fluridone. In vitro activity levels of the enzymes correlated with in vivo resistance of the corresponding biotypes. As hydrilla spread rapidly to lakes across the southern United States in the past, the expansion of resistant biotypes is likely to pose significant environmental challenges in the future.

          Related collections

          Most cited references18

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          Environmental and Economic Costs of Nonindigenous Species in the United States

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Structure and functional analysis of a marine bacterial carotenoid biosynthesis gene cluster and astaxanthin biosynthetic pathway proposed at the gene level.

            A carotenoid biosynthesis gene cluster for the production of astaxanthin was isolated from the marine bacterium Agrobacterium aurantiacum. This cluster contained five carotenogenic genes with the same orientation, which were designated crtW, crtZ, crtY, crtI, and crtB. The stop codons of individual crt genes except for crtB overlapped the start codons of the following crt genes. Escherichia coli transformants carrying the Erwinia uredovora carotenoid biosynthesis genes provide suitable substrates for carotenoid biosynthesis. The functions of the five crt genes of A. aurantiacum were determined through chromatographic and spectroscopic analyses of the pigments accumulated in some E. coli transformants carrying various combinations of the E. uredovora and A. aurantiacum carotenogenic genes. As a result, the astaxanthin biosynthetic pathway is proposed for the first time at the level of the biosynthesis genes. The crtW and crtZ gene products, which mediated the oxygenation reactions from beta-carotene to astaxanthin, were found to have low substrate specificity. This allowed the production of many presumed intermediates of astaxanthin, i.e., adonixanthin, phoenicoxanthin (adonirubin), canthaxanthin, 3'-hydroxyechinenone, and 3-hydroxyechinenone.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Reproductive systems and evolution in vascular plants.

              Differences in the frequency with which offspring are produced asexually, through self-fertilization and through sexual outcrossing, are a predominant influence on the genetic structure of plant populations. Selfers and asexuals have fewer genotypes within populations than outcrossers with similar allele frequencies, and more genetic diversity in selfers and asexuals is a result of differences among populations than in sexual outcrossers. As a result of reduced levels of diversity, selfers and asexuals may be less able to respond adaptively to changing environments, and because genotypes are not mixed across family lineages, their populations may accumulate deleterious mutations more rapidly. Such differences suggest that selfing and asexual lineages may be evolutionarily short-lived and could explain why they often seem to be of recent origin. Nonetheless, the origin and maintenance of different reproductive modes must be linked to individual-level properties of survival and reproduction. Sexual outcrossers suffer from a cost of outcrossing that arises because they do not contribute to selfed or asexual progeny, whereas selfers and asexuals may contribute to outcrossed progeny. Selfing and asexual reproduction also may allow reproduction when circumstances reduce opportunities for a union of gametes produced by different individuals, a phenomenon known as reproductive assurance. Both the cost of outcrossing and reproductive assurance lead to an over-representation of selfers and asexuals in newly formed progeny, and unless sexual outcrossers are more likely to survive and reproduce, they eventually will be displaced from populations in which a selfing or asexual variant arises.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Molecular Ecology
                Wiley
                09621083
                October 2004
                August 24 2004
                : 13
                : 10
                : 3229-3237
                Article
                10.1111/j.1365-294X.2004.02280.x
                15367135
                62113c8e-1b31-462d-88f7-6116da6327a1
                © 2004

                http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1

                History

                Comments

                Comment on this article