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      Genetic and Environmental Effects on Same-sex Sexual Behavior: A Population Study of Twins in Sweden

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          Abstract

          There is still uncertainty about the relative importance of genes and environments on human sexual orientation. One reason is that previous studies employed self-selected, opportunistic, or small population-based samples. We used data from a truly population-based 2005-2006 survey of all adult twins (20-47 years) in Sweden to conduct the largest twin study of same-sex sexual behavior attempted so far. We performed biometric modeling with data on any and total number of lifetime same-sex sexual partners, respectively. The analyses were conducted separately by sex. Twin resemblance was moderate for the 3,826 studied monozygotic and dizygotic same-sex twin pairs. Biometric modeling revealed that, in men, genetic effects explained .34-.39 of the variance, the shared environment .00, and the individual-specific environment .61-.66 of the variance. Corresponding estimates among women were .18-.19 for genetic factors, .16-.17 for shared environmental, and 64-.66 for unique environmental factors. Although wide confidence intervals suggest cautious interpretation, the results are consistent with moderate, primarily genetic, familial effects, and moderate to large effects of the nonshared environment (social and biological) on same-sex sexual behavior.

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          Gender differences in erotic plasticity: the female sex drive as socially flexible and responsive.

          Responding to controversies about the balance between nature and culture in determining human sexuality, the author proposes that the female sex drive is more malleable than the male in response to sociocultural and situational factors. A large assortment of evidence supports 3 predictions based on the hypothesis of female erotic plasticity: (a) Individual women will exhibit more variation across time than men in sexual behavior, (b) female sexuality will exhibit larger effects than male in response to most specific sociocultural variables, and (c) sexual attitude-behavior consistency will be lower for women than men. Several possible explanations for female erotic plasticity are reviewed, including adaptation to superior male political and physical power, the centrality of female change (from no to yes) as a prerequisite for intercourse, and the idea that women have a milder sex drive than men.
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            A linkage between DNA markers on the X chromosome and male sexual orientation

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              Genetic and environmental influences on sexual orientation and its correlates in an Australian twin sample.

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Archives of Sexual Behavior
                Arch Sex Behav
                Springer Science and Business Media LLC
                0004-0002
                1573-2800
                February 2010
                June 7 2008
                February 2010
                : 39
                : 1
                : 75-80
                Article
                10.1007/s10508-008-9386-1
                18536986
                62444617-0dff-4ca5-ac4b-17db3bf0e5fd
                © 2010

                http://www.springer.com/tdm

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