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      Psychoactive Drugs and Human Sexual Behavior: The Role of Serotonergic Activity

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      Journal of Psychoactive Drugs
      Informa UK Limited

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          Abstract

          A wide range of both prescription and nonprescription drugs has been reported to affect human sexual functioning. While the sexual side effects resulting from drug use have often been attributed to adrenergic, anticholinergic or dopaminergic activity, the present review considers the potential role of serotonin. Based on animal studies, serotonin has been shown to either facilitate or inhibit sexual activity depending on which serotonin receptor subtype is activated. However, few studies have been done in the human that assess the effects of drugs that bind selectively to serotonin receptors. Consequently, little is known about the role of serotonin in human sexual functioning. In this review, a wide range of drugs that affect both brain serotonergic systems and human sexual behavior is examined in an effort to determine the possible role of serotonin in human sexual behavior. A review of the literature is consistent with the hypothesis that the 5-HT1A and the 5-HT2 receptor subtypes play a facilitatory role in human sexual behavior. The evidence suggests that drugs that act as agonists on these receptor sites enhance sexual functioning in the human, while those that act as antagonists inhibit sexual functioning.

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          Receptor activity and turnover of dopamine and noradrenaline after neuroleptics

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            Long-term antidepressant treatment decreases spiroperidol-labeled serotonin receptor binding.

            Antidepressants compete at several neurotransmitter receptor binding site, but drug affinities do not correlate with clinical efficacy. Long-term, but not short-term, antidepressant treatment decreases the numbers of both serotonin and beta-adrenergic receptors. The decrease in the number of receptor sites is most marked for [3H]spiroperidol-labeled serotonin receptors and is characteristic for antidepressants of several classes.
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              AMPHETAMINE PSYCHOSIS

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Psychoactive Drugs
                Journal of Psychoactive Drugs
                Informa UK Limited
                0279-1072
                2159-9777
                January 1992
                January 1992
                : 24
                : 1
                : 1-40
                Article
                10.1080/02791072.1992.10471616
                1619520
                62b87a29-f812-468b-bc1a-4213e4b722f4
                © 1992
                History

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