0
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Floristic diversity and vegetation of the az Zakhnuniyah Island, Arabian Gulf, Saudi Arabia

      research-article
      Heliyon
      Elsevier
      Biodiversity, Cluster analysis, Conservation, Halophytes, Salt marshes, Ordination

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Islands are broadly recognized as hotspots of ecology, biological and geophysical diversity with unique plant species. The present study aimed to address the floristic composition in the Az Zakhnuniyah Island along the Arabian Gulf of Saudi Arabia. A total of 21 quadrats, of 100 m 2 each were sampled, and both relative density and cover were determined. Classification (Agglomerative Hierarchical Clustering {AHC} and ordination [Detrended Correspondence Analysis (DCA) and Canonical Correspondence Analysis (CCA)] were applied to identify vegetation clusters and their correlation to the underlying soil factors. Fifty plant species belonging to 21 families were recorded. Amaranthaceae (22.9%), Poaceae (12.5%), Asteraceae and Zygophyllaceae (8.33% each) were the largest represented families. Therophytes and chamaephytes were the most represented life-forms, indicating saline-desert vegetation. Most of the surveyed plant species are used for medicinal purposes and grazing. AHC and DCA allowed identifying three vegetation clusters within three distinct habitats: cluster (A): Halopeplis perfoliata- Suaeda vermiculata in wet salt-marsh habitat, cluster (B): Limonium axillare- Zygophyllum mandaville in sabkha, and cluster (C): Heliotropium bacciferum- Panicum turgidum in sand dune habitat within the island. The CCA results imply strong relationships between floristic composition and salinity measures (CaCO 3, electric conductivity, Mg +2, Na +, K +, Cl and SO 4) and soil texture. The current vegetation pattern in Zakhnuniyah Island reflects a salinity gradient with variations in soil texture. Knowledge of the floristic composition and its correlation to the environmental factors within islands should guide future conservation strategy and management efforts.

          Abstract

          Biodiversity; Cluster analysis; Conservation; Halophytes; Salt marshes; Ordination

          Related collections

          Most cited references53

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: found
          Is Open Access

          Potential Use of Halophytes to Remediate Saline Soils

          Salinity is one of the rising problems causing tremendous yield losses in many regions of the world especially in arid and semiarid regions. To maximize crop productivity, these areas should be brought under utilization where there are options for removing salinity or using the salt-tolerant crops. Use of salt-tolerant crops does not remove the salt and hence halophytes that have capacity to accumulate and exclude the salt can be an effective way. Methods for salt removal include agronomic practices or phytoremediation. The first is cost- and labor-intensive and needs some developmental strategies for implication; on the contrary, the phytoremediation by halophyte is more suitable as it can be executed very easily without those problems. Several halophyte species including grasses, shrubs, and trees can remove the salt from different kinds of salt-affected problematic soils through salt excluding, excreting, or accumulating by their morphological, anatomical, physiological adaptation in their organelle level and cellular level. Exploiting halophytes for reducing salinity can be good sources for meeting the basic needs of people in salt-affected areas as well. This review focuses on the special adaptive features of halophytic plants under saline condition and the possible ways to utilize these plants to remediate salinity.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Responses of Coastal Wetlands to Rising Sea Level

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Reconciling conflicting perspectives for biodiversity conservation in the Anthropocene

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                Heliyon
                Heliyon
                Heliyon
                Elsevier
                2405-8440
                19 July 2022
                July 2022
                19 July 2022
                : 8
                : 7
                Affiliations
                [1]Department of Biology, College of Science, Imam Abdulrahman Bin Faisal University, Dammam, 31441, Saudi Arabia
                Author notes
                []Corresponding author. Waltaisan@ 123456iau.edu.sa
                Article
                S2405-8440(22)01284-1 e09996
                10.1016/j.heliyon.2022.e09996
                9307451
                35879996
                6324a5bf-0217-4070-bc48-6ae65304b7b4
                © 2022 The Author(s)

                This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

                Categories
                Research Article

                biodiversity,cluster analysis,conservation,halophytes,salt marshes,ordination

                Comments

                Comment on this article