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      Transformative Social and Emotional Learning (SEL): Toward SEL in Service of Educational Equity and Excellence

      1 , 2 , 1
      Educational Psychologist
      Informa UK Limited

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          Having less, giving more: the influence of social class on prosocial behavior.

          Lower social class (or socioeconomic status) is associated with fewer resources, greater exposure to threat, and a reduced sense of personal control. Given these life circumstances, one might expect lower class individuals to engage in less prosocial behavior, prioritizing self-interest over the welfare of others. The authors hypothesized, by contrast, that lower class individuals orient to the welfare of others as a means to adapt to their more hostile environments and that this orientation gives rise to greater prosocial behavior. Across 4 studies, lower class individuals proved to be more generous (Study 1), charitable (Study 2), trusting (Study 3), and helpful (Study 4) compared with their upper class counterparts. Mediator and moderator data showed that lower class individuals acted in a more prosocial fashion because of a greater commitment to egalitarian values and feelings of compassion. Implications for social class, prosocial behavior, and economic inequality are discussed.
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            Selective Moral Disengagement in the Exercise of Moral Agency

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              Awe, the small self, and prosocial behavior.

              Awe is an emotional response to perceptually vast stimuli that transcend current frames of reference. Guided by conceptual analyses of awe as a collective emotion, across 5 studies (N = 2,078) we tested the hypothesis that awe can result in a diminishment of the individual self and its concerns, and increase prosocial behavior. In a representative national sample (Study 1), dispositional tendencies to experience awe predicted greater generosity in an economic game above and beyond other prosocial emotions (e.g., compassion). In follow-up experiments, inductions of awe (relative to various control states) increased ethical decision-making (Study 2), generosity (Study 3), and prosocial values (Study 4). Finally, a naturalistic induction of awe in which participants stood in a grove of towering trees enhanced prosocial helping behavior and decreased entitlement compared to participants in a control condition (Study 5). Mediational data demonstrate that the effects of awe on prosociality are explained, in part, by feelings of a small self. These findings indicate that awe may help situate individuals within broader social contexts and enhance collective concern.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Educational Psychologist
                Educational Psychologist
                Informa UK Limited
                0046-1520
                1532-6985
                June 11 2019
                July 03 2019
                July 22 2019
                July 03 2019
                : 54
                : 3
                : 162-184
                Affiliations
                [1 ] Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning, Chicago, Illinois
                [2 ] Department of Psychology, University of Michigan
                Article
                10.1080/00461520.2019.1623032
                63512ac5-18c5-4280-baa1-00d32a63df91
                © 2019
                History

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