Blog
About

5
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Conflict in invasive species management

      , ,

      Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment

      Wiley-Blackwell

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 48

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Impacts of biological invasions: what's what and the way forward.

          Study of the impacts of biological invasions, a pervasive component of global change, has generated remarkable understanding of the mechanisms and consequences of the spread of introduced populations. The growing field of invasion science, poised at a crossroads where ecology, social sciences, resource management, and public perception meet, is increasingly exposed to critical scrutiny from several perspectives. Although the rate of biological invasions, elucidation of their consequences, and knowledge about mitigation are growing rapidly, the very need for invasion science is disputed. Here, we highlight recent progress in understanding invasion impacts and management, and discuss the challenges that the discipline faces in its science and interactions with society. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            A mid-term analysis of progress toward international biodiversity targets.

            In 2010, the international community, under the auspices of the Convention on Biological Diversity, agreed on 20 biodiversity-related "Aichi Targets" to be achieved within a decade. We provide a comprehensive mid-term assessment of progress toward these global targets using 55 indicator data sets. We projected indicator trends to 2020 using an adaptive statistical framework that incorporated the specific properties of individual time series. On current trajectories, results suggest that despite accelerating policy and management responses to the biodiversity crisis, the impacts of these efforts are unlikely to be reflected in improved trends in the state of biodiversity by 2020. We highlight areas of societal endeavor requiring additional efforts to achieve the Aichi Targets, and provide a baseline against which to assess future progress.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              "Opening Up" and "Closing Down": Power, Participation, and Pluralism in the Social Appraisal of Technology

               A Stirling (2007)
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment
                Front Ecol Environ
                Wiley-Blackwell
                15409295
                April 2017
                April 2017
                : 15
                : 3
                : 133-141
                10.1002/fee.1471
                © 2017

                http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1

                Comments

                Comment on this article