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      Discoveries from La Manche: Five Years of Early Prehistoric Research in the Channel Island of Jersey

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          Abstract

          Since 2010 a new field project drawn from major UK institutions including the UCL Institute of Archaeology, has focused research on the Palaeolithic and Mesolithic record of the Channel Island of Jersey. In this retrospective of five years of research the history of the project to date, its focus on the Middle Palaeolithic site of La Cotte de St Brelade and its growth into an international research team is charted. The formation of the La Manche Prehistorique research network in 2015 marks a new chapter in the development of this project. With its wider focus, but continued commitment to research in the Channel Islands, the research group are working towards a unified early prehistoric research framework for the English Channel region.

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          Dynamic landscapes and human dispersal patterns: tectonics, coastlines, and the reconstruction of human habitats

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            A new view from La Cotte de St Brelade, Jersey

            Did Neanderthal hunters drive mammoth herds over cliffs in mass kills? Excavations at La Cotte de St Brelade in the 1960s and 1970s uncovered heaps of mammoth bones, interpreted as evidence of intentional hunting drives. New study of this Middle Palaeolithic coastal site, however, indicates a very different landscape to the featureless coastal plain that was previously envisaged. Reconsideration of the bone heaps themselves further undermines the ‘mass kill’ hypothesis, suggesting that these were simply the final accumulations of bone at the site, undisturbed and preserved in situ when the return to a cold climate blanketed them in wind-blown loess.
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              Late Neanderthal occupation in North-West Europe: rediscovery, investigation and dating of a last glacial sediment sequence at the site of La Cotte de Saint Brelade, Jersey

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                2048-4194
                Archaeology International
                Ubiquity Press
                2048-4194
                23 November 2015
                : 18
                : 113-123
                Affiliations
                UCL Institute of Archaeology, London WC1H OPY, United Kingdom
                The British Museum,UK
                School of Archaeology, University of Wales, Lampeter, UK
                Department of Geography, University of St Andrews, UK
                Department of Archaeology, University of Manchester, UK
                University of Rennes 2, France
                University of Southampton, UK
                Article
                10.5334/ai.1813
                Copyright: © 2015 The Author(s)

                This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License (CC-BY 3.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. See http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/.

                Categories
                Research article

                Archaeology, Cultural studies

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