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      Two new green-spored species of Trichoderma (Sordariomycetes, Ascomycota) and their phylogenetic positions

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      MycoKeys

      Pensoft Publishers

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          Abstract

          Two new species of Trichoderma are described based on the collections producing ascomata or asexual morphs on woody substrates, and named as Trichoderma fujianense and T. zonatum. Trichoderma fujianense produces gliocladium to verticillium-like conidiophores, slender to lageniform phialides, green and ellipsoidal to cylindrical conidia. Trichoderma zonatum is characterized by pulvinate, pale yellow to light brown stromata with densely disposed dark green to black ostioles, monomorphic ascospores, simple trichoderma-like conidiophores, green, (sub)globose to pyriform conidia. Their phylogenetic positions were investigated inferred from sequence analyses of the combined RNA polymerase II subunit b and translation elongation factor 1-α genes. The results indicate that T. fujianense, along with T. aureoviride and T. candidum, represents an independent lineage with high statistical support. Trichoderma zonatum belongs to the Chlorosporum clade and is associated with but clearly separated from T. rosulatum and T. costaricense. Morphological distinctions and sequence divergences between the new species and their close relatives were discussed.

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          The Clustal X windows interface: Flexible strategies for multiple sequence alignment aided by quality analysis tools.

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            The CLUSTAL_X windows interface: Flexible strategies for multiple sequence alignment aided by quality analysis tools

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              Can three incongruence tests predict when data should be combined?

              Advocates of conditional combination have argued that testing for incongruence between data partitions is an important step in data exploration. Unless the partitions have had distinct histories, as in horizontal gene transfer, incongruence means that one or more data support the wrong phylogeny. This study examines the relationship between incongruence and phylogenetic accuracy using three tests of incongruence. These tests were applied to pairs of mitochondrial DNA data partitions from two well-corroborated vertebrate phylogenies. Of the three tests, the most useful was the incongruence length difference test (ILD, also called the partition homogeneity test). This test distinguished between cases in which combining the data generally improved phylogenetic accuracy (P > 0.01) and cases in which accuracy of the combined data suffered relative to the individual partitions (P < 0.001). In contrast, in several cases, the Templeton and Rodrigo tests detected highly significant incongruence (P < 0.001) even though combining the incongruent partitions actually increased phylogenetic accuracy. All three tests identified cases in which improving the reconstruction model would improve the phylogenetic accuracy of the individual partitions.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                MycoKeys
                MC
                Pensoft Publishers
                1314-4049
                1314-4057
                September 15 2017
                September 15 2017
                : 26
                : 61-75
                Article
                10.3897/mycokeys.26.14919
                © 2017

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