10
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Fungal pathogen reduces potential for malaria transmission.

      Science (New York, N.Y.)

      Animals, Anopheles, microbiology, parasitology, physiology, Blood, Feeding Behavior, Hypocreales, pathogenicity, Insect Vectors, Malaria, prevention & control, transmission, Mice, Mitosporic Fungi, Pest Control, Biological, Plasmodium chabaudi, growth & development, Spores, Fungal, Virulence

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Using a rodent malaria model, we found that exposure to surfaces treated with fungal entomopathogens following an infectious blood meal reduced the number of mosquitoes able to transmit malaria by a factor of about 80. Fungal infection, achieved through contact with both solid surfaces and netting for durations well within the typical post-feed resting periods, was sufficient to cause >90% mortality. Daily mortality rates escalated dramatically around the time of sporozoite maturation, and infected mosquitoes showed reduced propensity to blood feed. Residual sprays of fungal biopesticides might replace or supplement chemical insecticides for malaria control, particularly in areas of high insecticide resistance.

          Related collections

          Author and article information

          Journal
          15947189
          10.1126/science.1108423

          Comments

          Comment on this article