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      Investigation of possible molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of adhesion in Vibrio alginolyticus with comparative transcriptome analysis

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          Abstract

          Adhesion capability to fish mucus, which can be affected by environmental conditions, is considered to be a key virulence factor of Vibrio alginolyticus although the molecular mechanism is still unclear. In the present study, V. alginolyticus was treated with stress conditions including Cu 2+ (50 mg/L), Pb 2+ (100 mg/L), Hg 2+ (50 mg/L) and low pH (pH 5). We found these stress treatments were capable of reducing the adhesion of V. alginolyticus, while the expression levels of multiple genes were significantly changed according to the results of high throughput sequencing. The expression of randomly selected genes was confirmed by QPCR, which reinforced the reliability of the sequencing data. Ontology assignments and KEGG pathway analysis indicated that stress treatments affect pathways that may be related to adhesion. Our results identified genes which might play a key role in the adhesion process of V. alginolyticus, which could lay a foundation for further functional analysis of these genes in the process of adhesion. As these genes were sensitive to environmental factors, this may explain why the adhesion process can be influenced by environmental factors.

          Electronic supplementary material

          The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s10482-015-0411-9) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

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          Most cited references 38

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          Understanding biology at the single-cell level requires simultaneous measurements of biochemical parameters and behavioral characteristics in individual cells. Here, the output of individual flagellar motors in Escherichia coli was measured as a function of the intracellular concentration of the chemotactic signaling protein. The concentration of this molecule, fused to green fluorescent protein, was monitored with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Motors from different bacteria exhibited an identical steep input-output relation, suggesting that they actively contribute to signal amplification in chemotaxis. This experimental approach can be extended to quantitative in vivo studies of other biochemical networks.
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            Applications of new sequencing technologies for transcriptome analysis.

            Transcriptome analysis has been a key area of biological inquiry for decades. Over the years, research in the field has progressed from candidate gene-based detection of RNAs using Northern blotting to high-throughput expression profiling driven by the advent of microarrays. Next-generation sequencing technologies have revolutionized transcriptomics by providing opportunities for multidimensional examinations of cellular transcriptomes in which high-throughput expression data are obtained at a single-base resolution.
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              Receptor clustering and signal processing in E. coli chemotaxis.

              Chemotaxis in Escherichia coli is one of the most thoroughly studied model systems for signal transduction. Receptor-kinase complexes, organized in clusters at the cell poles, sense chemoeffector stimuli and transmit signals to flagellar motors by phosphorylation of a diffusible response regulator protein. Despite the apparent simplicity of the signal transduction pathway, the high sensitivity, wide dynamic range and integration of multiple stimuli of this pathway remain unexplained. Recent advances in computer modeling and in quantitative experimental analysis suggest that cooperative protein interactions in receptor clusters play a crucial role in the signal processing during bacterial chemotaxis.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                86 592 6183028 , yanqp@jmu.edu.cn
                Journal
                Antonie Van Leeuwenhoek
                Antonie Van Leeuwenhoek
                Antonie Van Leeuwenhoek
                Springer International Publishing (Cham )
                0003-6072
                1572-9699
                1 March 2015
                1 March 2015
                2015
                : 107
                : 5
                : 1197-1206
                Affiliations
                [ ]Key Laboratory of Healthy Mariculture for the East China Sea, Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries College, Jimei University, Xiamen, 361021 Fujian People’s Republic of China
                [ ]College of Ocean & Earth Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen, 361005 Fujian People’s Republic of China
                Article
                411
                10.1007/s10482-015-0411-9
                4387256
                25726081
                © The Author(s) 2015

                Open AccessThis article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits any use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author(s) and the source are credited.

                Categories
                Original Paper
                Custom metadata
                © Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2015

                Microbiology & Virology

                transcriptome, adhesion, vibrio alginolyticus

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