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      Editorial for the Special Issue on Cognitive Bias Modification Techniques: An Introduction to a Time Traveller’s Tale

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      Cognitive Therapy and Research

      Springer Nature

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          Most cited references 54

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          Attentional bias in emotional disorders.

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            A cognitive-behavioral model of anxiety in social phobia.

            The current paper presents a model of the experience of anxiety in social/evaluative situations in people with social phobia. The model describes the manner in which people with social phobia perceive and process information related to potential evaluation and the way in which these processes differ between people high and low in social anxiety. It is argued that distortions and biases in the processing of social/evaluative information lead to heightened anxiety in social situations and, in turn, help to maintain social phobia. Potential etiological factors as well as treatment implications are also discussed.
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              Cognitive vulnerability to emotional disorders.

              A review of recent research on cognitive processing indicates that biases in attention, memory, and interpretation, as well as repetitive negative thoughts, are common across emotional disorders, although they vary in form according to type of disorder. Current cognitive models emphasize specific forms of biased processing, such as variations in the focus of attention or habitual interpretative styles that contribute to the risk of developing particular disorders. As well as predicting risk of emotional disorders, new studies have provided evidence of a causal relationship between processing bias and vulnerability. Beyond merely demonstrating the existence of biased processing, research is thus beginning to explore the cognitive causes of emotional vulnerability, and their modification.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Cognitive Therapy and Research
                Cogn Ther Res
                Springer Nature
                0147-5916
                1573-2819
                April 2014
                March 2 2014
                April 2014
                : 38
                : 2
                : 83-88
                10.1007/s10608-014-9605-0
                © 2014
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