28
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      A repertoire of biomedical applications of noble metal nanoparticles

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          The emerging properties of noble metal nanoparticles are attracting huge interest from the translational scientific community. In this feature article, we highlight recent advances in the adaptation of noble metal nanomaterials and their biomedical applications in therapeutics, diagnostics and sensing.

          Abstract

          Noble metals comprise any of several metallic chemical elements that are outstandingly resistant to corrosion and oxidation, even at elevated temperatures. This group is not strictly defined, but the tentative list includes ruthenium, rhodium, palladium, silver, osmium, iridium, platinum and gold, in order of atomic number. The emerging properties of noble metal nanoparticles are attracting huge interest from the translational scientific community and have led to an unprecedented expansion of research and exploration of applications in biotechnology and biomedicine. Noble metal nanomaterials can be synthesised both by top-down and bottom up approaches, as well as via organism-assisted routes, and subsequently modified appropriately for the field of use. Nanoscale analogues of gold, silver, platinum, and palladium in particular, have gained primary importance owing to their excellent intrinsic properties and diversity of applications; they offer unique functional attributes, which are quite unlike the bulk material. Modulation of noble metal nanoparticles in terms of size, shape and surface functionalisation has endowed them with unusual capabilities and manipulation at the chemical level, which can lead to changes in their electrical, chemical, optical, spectral and other intrinsic properties. Such flexibility in multi-functionalisation delivers ‘Ockham's razor’ to applied biomedical science. In this feature article, we highlight recent advances in the adaptation of noble metal nanomaterials and their biomedical applications in therapeutics, diagnostics and sensing.

          Related collections

          Most cited references425

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          Analysis of nanoparticle delivery to tumours

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            A study of the nucleation and growth processes in the synthesis of colloidal gold

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              A DNA-based method for rationally assembling nanoparticles into macroscopic materials.

              Colloidal particles of metals and semiconductors have potentially useful optical, optoelectronic and material properties that derive from their small (nanoscopic) size. These properties might lead to applications including chemical sensors, spectroscopic enhancers, quantum dot and nanostructure fabrication, and microimaging methods. A great deal of control can now be exercised over the chemical composition, size and polydispersity of colloidal particles, and many methods have been developed for assembling them into useful aggregates and materials. Here we describe a method for assembling colloidal gold nanoparticles rationally and reversibly into macroscopic aggregates. The method involves attaching to the surfaces of two batches of 13-nm gold particles non-complementary DNA oligonucleotides capped with thiol groups, which bind to gold. When we add to the solution an oligonucleotide duplex with 'sticky ends' that are complementary to the two grafted sequences, the nanoparticles self-assemble into aggregates. This assembly process can be reversed by thermal denaturation. This strategy should now make it possible to tailor the optical, electronic and structural properties of the colloidal aggregates by using the specificity of DNA interactions to direct the interactions between particles of different size and composition.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                CHCOFS
                Chemical Communications
                Chem. Commun.
                Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC)
                1359-7345
                1364-548X
                June 13 2019
                2019
                : 55
                : 49
                : 6964-6996
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine
                [2 ]Linkoping University
                [3 ]Linkoping
                [4 ]Sweden
                [5 ]Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology
                [6 ]University of Cambridge
                [7 ]Cambridge
                [8 ]UK
                [9 ]Department of Chemistry
                [10 ]Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati
                [11 ]India
                [12 ]Hacettepe University
                [13 ]Faculty of Science
                [14 ]Ankara
                [15 ]Turkey
                [16 ]SATM
                [17 ]Cranfield University
                [18 ]Bedfordshire
                Article
                10.1039/C9CC01741K
                6568772a-c899-4f0b-8a29-35f76480e875
                © 2019

                http://rsc.li/journals-terms-of-use

                History

                Comments

                Comment on this article