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      A century later: Woodworth's (1899) two-component model of goal-directed aiming.

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      Psychological Bulletin

      American Psychological Association (APA)

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          Abstract

          In 1899, R. S. Woodworth published a seminal monograph, "The Accuracy of Voluntary Movement." As well as making a number of important empirical contributions, Woodworth presented a model of speed-accuracy relations in the control of upper limb movements. The model has come to be known as the two-component model because the control of speeded limb movements was hypothesized to entail both a central and a feedback-based component. Woodworth's (1899) ideas about the control of rapid aiming movements are evaluated in the context of current empirical and theoretical contributions.

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          Most cited references 78

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          Optimality in human motor performance: ideal control of rapid aimed movements.

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            Role of the posterior parietal cortex in updating reaching movements to a visual target.

            The exact role of posterior parietal cortex (PPC) in visually directed reaching is unknown. We propose that, by building an internal representation of instantaneous hand location, PPC computes a dynamic motor error used by motor centers to correct the ongoing trajectory. With unseen right hands, five subjects pointed to visual targets that either remained stationary or moved during saccadic eye movements. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was applied over the left PPC during target presentation. Stimulation disrupted path corrections that normally occur in response to target jumps, but had no effect on those directed at stationary targets. Furthermore, left-hand movement corrections were not blocked, ruling out visual or oculomotor effects of stimulation.
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              INFORMATION CAPACITY OF DISCRETE MOTOR RESPONSES.

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Psychological Bulletin
                Psychological Bulletin
                American Psychological Association (APA)
                1939-1455
                0033-2909
                2001
                2001
                : 127
                : 3
                : 342-357
                Article
                11393300
                © 2001

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