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      Sampling event dataset for ecological monitoring of riparian restoration effort in Colorado foothills

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          Abstract

          Background

          The foothills and shortgrass prairie ecosystems of Colorado, United States, have undergone substantial and sustained anthropogenic habitat change over the past two centuries. Riparian systems have been dramatically altered by agriculture, hydrological engineering, urbanisation and the introduction of non-native invasive species. In 2016, Denver Botanic Gardens began a restoration effort of Deer Creek which seeks to modify the hydrology of the creek by mimicking the effects of beaver dams with artificial structures. The site, owned by the US Army Core of Engineers and managed by Denver Botanic Gardens, had been the subject of previous botanical surveys. With the initiation of the restoration project, permanent transects were established along the stream and are sampled for ground vegetation richness and abundance, canopy cover, soil and stream conditions and aquatic macroinvertebrate community makeup on an annual basis. To provide a means for tracking any post-intervention changes in the riparian ecosystem, this resource reports all recorded occurrences and measurements, along with methodologies and motivations from past and current surveys in the form of a sampling event dataset.

          New information

          The current project and past surveys document 382 plant taxa and 157 aquatic macroinvertebrate taxa. A total of 16304 occurrences and 7422 measurements are included in the resource. Occurrence and measurement data taken from transects provide a means to measure species abundance, ground cover and other biotic and abiotic characteristics relevant to assessing the effects of hydrological restoration on riparian plant communities.

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          Most cited references 13

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          Riparian deforestation, stream narrowing, and loss of stream ecosystem services.

          A study of 16 streams in eastern North America shows that riparian deforestation causes channel narrowing, which reduces the total amount of stream habitat and ecosystem per unit channel length and compromises in-stream processing of pollutants. Wide forest reaches had more macroinvertebrates, total ecosystem processing of organic matter, and nitrogen uptake per unit channel length than contiguous narrow deforested reaches. Stream narrowing nullified any potential advantages of deforestation regarding abundance of fish, quality of dissolved organic matter, and pesticide degradation. These findings show that forested stream channels have a wider and more natural configuration, which significantly affects the total in-stream amount and activity of the ecosystem, including the processing of pollutants. The results reinforce both current policy of the United States that endorses riparian forest buffers as best management practice and federal and state programs that subsidize riparian reforestation for stream restoration and water quality. Not only do forest buffers prevent nonpoint source pollutants from entering small streams, they also enhance the in-stream processing of both nonpoint and point source pollutants, thereby reducing their impact on downstream rivers and estuaries.
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            Why Climate Change Makes Riparian Restoration More Important than Ever: Recommendations for Practice and Research

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              From ecosystems to ecosystem services: Stream restoration as ecological engineering

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                Biodivers Data J
                Biodivers Data J
                1
                urn:lsid:arphahub.com:pub:F9B2E808-C883-5F47-B276-6D62129E4FF4
                urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:245B00E9-BFE5-4B4F-B76E-15C30BA74C02
                Biodiversity Data Journal
                Pensoft Publishers
                1314-2836
                1314-2828
                2020
                03 April 2020
                : 8
                Affiliations
                [1 ] Denver Botanic Gardens, Denver, United States of America Denver Botanic Gardens Denver United States of America
                Author notes
                Corresponding author: Richard Levy ( richard.levy@ 123456botanicgardens.org ).

                Academic editor: Quentin Groom

                Article
                51817 12816
                10.3897/BDJ.8.e51817
                7148387
                Richard Levy, Margo Paces, Rebecca Hufft

                This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

                Page count
                Figures: 2, Tables: 0, References: 16
                Funding
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                Categories
                Data Paper (Biosciences)
                Angiospermae
                Pinaceae
                Plantae
                Invertebrata
                Freshwater
                Biodiversity & Conservation
                Agricultural ecology
                Aquatic
                Mountain and Highlands
                Limnology
                Restoration ecology
                Urban and Built Environment
                Management
                Grasslands
                Urban ecology
                Ecosystem services
                Freshwater Biota & Ecosystems
                Nevada and Utah and Colorado

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