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      Menstrual cycle, reproductive function, body mass index, and metabolic profiles of women with former central precocious puberty: 10–20-year longitudinal cohort study in southern Thailand

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          Abstract

          Background

          In 2011, we described 64 girls diagnosed with central precocious puberty (CPP) during 1995–2009. In 2019, the former CPP patients were 16–30 years of age and had been followed-up for 6–20 years after cessation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone analog (GnRHa) treatment.

          Objectives

          To determine the menstrual cycle, reproductive function, and long-term sequelae of the former GnRHa-treated and untreated CPP patients.

          Methods

          Sixty-seven former CPP women diagnosed during January 1995 to December 2010 were evaluated in 2019 for current menstrual cycle and pregnancy rate and for general health status, weight, height, blood pressure, and metabolic profiles of glucose, lipids, insulin, and testosterone.

          Results

          In 2019, the former CPP women averaged 20.7 ± 2.7 years of age (range: 16.5–30). Eighty-three percent had a regular menstrual cycle. Of the 14 married women, six (43%) were fertile with 1–2 children. The untreated women had a significantly higher rate of obesity (BMI >25 kg/m 2) than the GnRHa-treated women (72.1% vs. 36.6%, p < 0.01). Two women (3%) had polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Fasting plasma glucose, serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and testosterone levels were normal and similar between the GnRHa-treated and untreated participants. The serum insulin, cholesterol, triglyceride, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) levels were higher in the untreated group than the GnRHa-treated group, but without significant differences.

          Conclusions

          At a 10–20-year follow-up, our former CPP patients had regular menstruation, normal reproductive function, and normal metabolic outcomes. The low prevalence of PCOS of 3% suggests that CPP is not a risk factor for PCOS, at least during early adulthood.

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          Most cited references 27

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          Homeostasis model assessment: insulin resistance and ?-cell function from fasting plasma glucose and insulin concentrations in man

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            Variations in pattern of pubertal changes in girls.

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              Positions statement: criteria for defining polycystic ovary syndrome as a predominantly hyperandrogenic syndrome: an Androgen Excess Society guideline.

              The Androgen Excess Society (AES) charged a task force to review all available data and recommend an evidence-based definition for polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), whether already in use or not, to guide clinical diagnosis and future research. Participants included expert investigators in the field. Based on a systematic review of the published peer-reviewed medical literature, by querying MEDLINE databases, we tried to identify studies evaluating the epidemiology or phenotypic aspects of PCOS. The task force drafted the initial report, following a consensus process via electronic communication, which was then reviewed and critiqued by the AES Board of Directors. No section was finalized until all members were satisfied with the contents and minority opinions noted. Statements that were not supported by peer-reviewed evidence were not included. Based on the available data, it is the view of the AES Task Force on the Phenotype of PCOS that there should be acceptance of the original 1990 National Institutes of Health criteria with some modifications, taking into consideration the concerns expressed in the proceedings of the 2003 Rotterdam conference. A principal conclusion was that PCOS should be first considered a disorder of androgen excess or hyperandrogenism, although a minority considered the possibility that there may be forms of PCOS without overt evidence of hyperandrogenism but recognized that more data are required before validating this supposition. Finally, the task force recognized, and fully expects, that the definition of this syndrome will evolve over time to incorporate new research findings.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism
                Walter de Gruyter GmbH
                2191-0251
                0334-018X
                July 28 2020
                July 28 2020
                : 33
                : 7
                : 933-940
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkhla, 90110, Thailand
                [2 ]Epidemiology Unit, Faculty of Medicine,Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkhla, 90110, Thailand
                Article
                10.1515/jpem-2020-0019
                © 2020

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