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      Autoimmune diseases induced by TNF-targeted therapies

      , , , ,
      Best Practice & Research Clinical Rheumatology
      Elsevier BV

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          Abstract

          Anti-TNF agents are increasingly being used for a rapidly expanding number of rheumatic and systemic autoimmune diseases. As a result of this use, and of the longer follow-up periods of treatment, there are a growing number of reports of the development of autoimmune processes related to anti-TNF agents. The clinical characteristics, outcomes, and patterns of association with the different anti-TNF agents used in all reports of autoimmune diseases developing after TNF-targeted therapy, were analyzed through a baseline Medline search of articles published between January 1990 and May 2008 (www.biogeas.org). A total of 379 cases of autoimmune diseases secondary to TNF-targeted therapies were identified. The anti-TNF agents were administered for rheumatoid arthritis in more than 80% of cases. The use of anti-TNF agents has been associated with an increasing number of cases of autoimmune diseases, principally cutaneous vasculitis, lupus-like syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus and interstitial lung disease. Other autoimmune diseases associated with TNF-targeted therapies have been recently described, e.g. sarcoidosis, antiphospholipid syndrome-related features, and autoimmune hepatitis or uveitis. Large, prospective, postmarketing studies are required to evaluate the risk of developing autoimmune diseases in patients receiving TNF-targeted therapies.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Best Practice & Research Clinical Rheumatology
          Best Practice & Research Clinical Rheumatology
          Elsevier BV
          15216942
          October 2008
          October 2008
          : 22
          : 5
          : 847-861
          Article
          10.1016/j.berh.2008.09.008
          19028367
          6623d256-af6e-4547-bc48-c62ed79774fa
          © 2008

          https://www.elsevier.com/tdm/userlicense/1.0/

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