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      Stop, Question, and Complain: Citizen Grievances Against the NYPD and the Opacity of Police Stops Across New York City Precincts, 2007–2013

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      Journal of Urban Health
      Springer Nature

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          Abstract

          <p class="first" id="d5415873e94">Data on police stops can be examined to reflect on the relative “opacity” of these encounters and how aggregate patterns on the nature—not just the volume—of reported stops relate to public scrutiny of the police. We hypothesize that public scrutiny on police stops is positively related to the prevalence of opaque stop practices across dimensions of “intrusiveness,” “rationale,” and “setting” derived from agency records. We further argue that this relationship is influenced by neighborhood conditions in the form of concentrated disadvantage, residential instability, and heterogeneity. To develop these ideas, we draw on a publicly available NYPD dataset on police stops to specify a series of fixed and random effects models that describe variation in recorded stop practices across precincts ( <i>N</i> = 74) and overtime ( <i>T</i> = 7, 2007–2013). We relate these practices to neighborhood conditions derived from the Census and examine their association with rates of SQF complaints to the CCRB. Results show considerable variation in indicators of opacity, particularly across precincts. More importantly, we also find that rates of complaints are higher in precincts that have more vaguely defined, intrusive stops. Results also suggest that concentrated disadvantage is independently and positively related with higher rates of public scrutiny of the police. </p>

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          An Analysis of the New York City Police Department's “Stop-and-Frisk” Policy in the Context of Claims of Racial Bias

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            Procedural Justice and Order Maintenance Policing: A Study of Inner‐City Young Men’s Perceptions of Police Legitimacy

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              Citizens' perceptions of police misconduct: Race and neighborhood context

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Urban Health
                J Urban Health
                Springer Nature
                1099-3460
                1468-2869
                April 2016
                December 21 2015
                : 93
                : S1
                : 32-41
                Article
                10.1007/s11524-015-0010-0
                4824691
                26690760
                665c36d5-a533-4861-81ab-a1ef53d89a70
                © 2015

                http://www.springer.com/tdm


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