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      Urban geochemistry and human-impacted imprint of dissolved trace and rare earth elements in a high-tech industrial city, Suzhou

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          Abstract

          Due to the rapid urbanization process, the consumption of trace and rare earth elements has dramatically increased. Although some elements have been extensively studied due to their high biological toxicity, most elements are ignored and taken seriously in recent years. Here, we investigated the urban geochemistry, source, and anthropogenic responding factor for 15 trace elements (Cd, Pb, Co, Sn, Cu, Ni, V, As, Mo, Sb, Al, Li, Fe, Zn, and Sr) and rare earth elements in surface water of the Suzhou city. The percentage of anthropogenic gadolinium vary from 46.9% (YCH-2) to 92.8% (WS-2), while the analysis of variance shows that human activities may affect the distribution of Cd, Co, Sn, Ni, As, Li, Fe, and Sr. Three clusters are obtained from the correlation and cluster analysis. The Cluster 1 with a significant positive correlation of Pb, Cd, Gd, Li, Sr, Co, Fe, Ni, and Sn reflecting these elements are dominantly influenced by urban sewage and industrial activities. The Cluster 2 (Zn, Cu, and Al) can be attributed to geologic sources, while the Cluster 3 (V, Mo, As, and Sb) indicate the combined action of agricultural and urban activities. The Gd versus Li plot showed a significant positive correlation, which can be used as a new indicator to trace the anthropogenic impact on urban waters. Overall, this study provides clear evidence that the content and distribution of Gd and Li are deeply affected by human activities in a high-tech industrial city (Suzhou), which can be regarded as emerging elements contaminations.

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              Microplastics pollution in inland freshwaters of China: A case study in urban surface waters of Wuhan, China

              Microplastics have been considered as an emerging pollutant in the aquatic environment. However, research about microplastic pollution in inland freshwaters of China is insufficient. The present study investigated the levels of microplastics in surface water of 20 urban lakes and urban reaches of the Hanjiang River and Yangtze River of Wuhan, the largest city in central China. Microplastic concentrations ranged from 1660.0±639.1 to 8925±1591n/m3 for the studied waters, with the highest concentration found in Bei Lake. Microplastic abundance in lakes varied markedly in space, and negatively correlated with the distance from the city center (p<0.001), which confirmed the important role of anthropogenic factors in microplastic distribution. Urban reaches of the Hanjiang River and Yangtze River were found to have relatively lower levels of microplastics than most of the studied lakes. The major type of microplastics among the studied waters was colored plastic, with fiber being the most frequent shape. More than 80% of microplastics in number had a size of <2mm. Polyethylene terephthalate and polypropylene were the dominant polymer-types of microplastics analyzed. This study provided important reference for better understanding microplastic levels in inland freshwaters.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Elementa: Science of the Anthropocene
                University of California Press
                2325-1026
                November 23 2021
                2021
                November 23 2021
                2021
                : 9
                : 1
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Key Laboratory of Karst Geological Resources and Environment, Ministry of Education, Guizhou University, Guiyang, China
                [2 ]The College of Resources and Environmental Engineering, Guizhou University, Guiyang, China
                [3 ]School of Public Health, Key Laboratory of Environmental Pollution and Disease Monitoring of Ministry of Education, Guizhou Medical University, Guiyang, China
                [4 ]Institute of Earth Sciences, China University of Geosciences, Beijing, China
                Article
                10.1525/elementa.2020.00151
                666a9c77-448c-474d-931d-347e79cbe001
                © 2021

                http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

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