4
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      The impact of prenatal parental tobacco smoking on risk of diabetes mellitus in middle-aged women

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Growing evidence indicates that parental smoking is associated with risk of offspring obesity. The purpose of this study was to identify whether parental tobacco smoking during gestation was associated with risk of diabetes mellitus. This is a prospective study of 44- to 54-year-old daughters ( n = 1801) born in the Child Health and Development Studies pregnancy cohort between 1959 and 1967. Their mothers resided near Oakland California, were members of the Kaiser Foundation Health Plan and reported parental tobacco smoking during an early pregnancy interview. Daughters reported physician diagnoses of diabetes mellitus and provided blood samples for hemoglobin A1C measurement. Prenatal maternal smoking had a stronger association with daughters’ diabetes mellitus risk than prenatal paternal smoking, and the former persisted after adjustment for parental race, diabetes and employment (aRR = 2.4 [95% confidence intervals 1.4–4.1] P < 0.01 and aRR = 1.7 [95% confidence intervals 1.0–3.0] P = 0.05, respectively). Estimates of the effect of parental smoking were unchanged when further adjusted by daughters’ birth weight or current body mass index (BMI). Maternal smoking was also significantly associated with self-reported type 2 diabetes diagnosis (2.3 [95% confidence intervals 1.0–5.0] P < 0.05). Having parents who smoked during pregnancy was associated with an increased risk of diabetes mellitus among adult daughters, independent of known risk factors, providing further evidence that prenatal environmental chemical exposures independent of birth weight and current BMI may contribute to adult diabetes mellitus. While other studies seek to confirm our results, caution toward tobacco smoking by or proximal to pregnant women is warranted in diabetes mellitus prevention efforts.

          Related collections

          Author and article information

          Journal
          101517692
          36728
          J Dev Orig Health Dis
          J Dev Orig Health Dis
          Journal of developmental origins of health and disease
          2040-1744
          2040-1752
          16 February 2019
          10 February 2015
          June 2015
          03 February 2020
          : 6
          : 3
          : 242-249
          Affiliations
          [1 ]Department of Environmental Toxicology, University of California, Davis, CA, USA
          [2 ]Child Health and Development Studies, Public Health Institute, Berkeley, CA, USA
          Author notes
          [* ]Address for correspondence: M. L. Merrill, Department of Environmental Toxicology, University of California at Davis, 1 Shields Avenue, 4245 Meyer Hall, CA 95616-5270, USA. ( mlamerrill@ 123456ucdavis.edu )
          Article
          PMC6996969 PMC6996969 6996969 nihpa934970
          10.1017/S2040174415000045
          6996969
          25665487
          Categories
          Article

          tobacco, smoking, obesity, diabetes, birth weight

          Comments

          Comment on this article