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      Histopathology and microscopic morphology of protozoan and metazoan parasites of free ranging armadillos in Brazil Translated title: Histopatologia e morfologia microscópica de parasitos protozoários e metazoários de tatus de vida livre no Brasil

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          Abstract

          ABSTRACT: This study assessed microscopic morphology of protozoan and metazoan parasites, as well as parasite-associated histopathologic changes in five Brazilian free-ranging armadillos. Three armadillos had intra sarcolemmal cysts of Sarcocystis sp. in skeletal muscles without microscopic changes. One Dasypus novemcinctus was found parasitized with a nematode morphologically compatible with an oxyurid in the small intestine. One Dasypus sp. had neutrophilic enteritis associated with adult and larval stages of Strongyloides sp. and one D. novemcinctus had multiple embryonated eggs free in the lumen of the small intestine with mild neutrophilic enteritis. These findings represent a contribution for expanding our knowledge on parasitic diseases of armadillos.

          Translated abstract

          RESUMO: Este estudo avaliou a morfologia microscópica de parasitos protozoários e metazoários, bem como lesões associadas ao parasitismo em cinco tatus de vida livre no Brasil. Três tatus tinham cistos de Sarcocystis sp. Intra-sarcolemal em músculos esqueléticos sem alterações microscópicas. Um Dasypus novemcinctus estava parasitado com um nematodo morfologicamente compatível com oxiurideo no intestino delgado. Um Dasypus sp. apresentou enterite neutrofílica associada com estágios larvais de Strongyloides sp. e um D. novemcinctus apresentou múltiplos ovos embrionados livres no lúmen do intestino delgado, associado a enterite neutrofílica discreta. Estes achados representam uma contribuição para a expansão do conhecimento sobre doenças parasitárias de tatus.

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          Most cited references 27

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          Nematóides do Brasil. Parte V: nematóides de mamíferos

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            Molecular detection of Ehrlichia canis, Anaplasma bovis, Anaplasma platys, Candidatus Midichloria mitochondrii and Babesia canis vogeli in ticks from Israel.

            : Ticks are vectors of important pathogens of human and animals. Therefore, their microbial carriage capacity is constantly being investigated. The aim of this study was to characterize the diversity of domestic animal pathogens in ticks collected from vegetation and the ground, from different parts of Israel. Non-engorged questing adult ticks were collected from 13 localities. A total of 1196 ticks in 131 pools-83 pools of Rhipicephalus turanicus and 48 of Rhipicephalus sanguineus (with two to ten ticks per pool)-were included in this study. In addition, 13 single free-roaming Hyalomma spp. ticks were collected. Screening by molecular techniques revealed the presence of Ehrlichia canis, Anaplasma platys, Anaplasma bovis and Babesia canis vogeli DNA in R. turanicus ticks. E. canis, A. bovis, B. canis vogeli and Candidatus Midichloria mitochondrii DNA sequences were detected in R. sanguineus ticks. Candidatus Midichloria mitochondrii DNA was also detected in Hyalomma spp. ticks. Neither Hepatozoon spp. nor Bartonella spp. DNA was detected in any of the ticks examined. This study describes the first detection of E. canis in the tick R. turanicus, which may serve as a vector of this canine pathogen; E. canis was the most common pathogen detected in the collected questing ticks. It also describes the first detection of A. bovis and Candidatus Midichloria mitochondrii in Israel. To the best of the author's knowledge, this is the first report describing the detection of DNA of the latter two pathogens in R. sanguineus, and of A. bovis in R. turanicus. © 2010 The Authors. Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2010 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.
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              Eosinophilic meningoencephalitis associated with rat lungworm (Angiostrongylus cantonensis) migration in two nine-banded armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus) and an opossum (Didelphis virginiana) in the southeastern United States

              Angiostrongylus cantonensis, the rat lungworm, was the cause of neural larval migrans in two nine-banded armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus) and one Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana) from the southeastern United States. Histologic findings in all three cases included eosinophilic meningoencephalitis with variable numbers of nematode larvae in the meninges or the neuroparenchyma. In two of the three cases, nematodes were extracted from brain tissue via a “squash prep” method. Identification of the nematodes was confirmed by amplification and sequence analysis of the partial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene from all three cases. Sequences (704bp) from the two cases from Louisiana were identical and 99.7% similar to nematodes detected in the armadillo from Florida. As A. cantonensis is now considered endemic in the southern United States, it should be considered as an important differential for any wild or domestic animal or human patient with neurological signs and eosinophilic meningitis. Many wildlife species frequently consume snails and slugs and could serve as sentinels for the detection of this parasite in regions where the presence of this parasite has not been confirmed. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first report of neural larval migrans due to A. cantonensis in an armadillo and provides additional documentation that this nematode can cause disease in wildlife species in the southeastern United States.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                pvb
                Pesquisa Veterinária Brasileira
                Pesq. Vet. Bras.
                Colégio Brasileiro de Patologia Animal - CBPA (Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil )
                0100-736X
                1678-5150
                2021
                : 41
                Affiliations
                Belo Horizonte Minas Gerais orgnameUniversidade Federal de Minas Gerais orgdiv1Escola de Veterinária orgdiv2Departamento de Clínica e Cirurgia Veterinária Brazil
                Jaboticabal orgnameUniversidade Estadual Paulista orgdiv1Faculdade de Ciências Agrárias e Veterinárias orgdiv2Departamento de Patologia, Reprodução e Saúde Única Brazil
                Silver Spring MD orgnameJoint Pathology Center USA
                Article
                S0100-736X2021000100508 S0100-736X(21)04100000508
                10.1590/1678-5150-pvb-6868

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.

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                Figures: 0, Tables: 0, Equations: 0, References: 27, Pages: 0
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                Wildlife Medicine

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