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      Defective entry of herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 into porcine cells and lack of infection in infant pigs indicate species tropism.

      The Journal of General Virology

      virology, Animals, Animals, Newborn, Antibodies, Viral, analysis, Cell Line, Cytopathogenic Effect, Viral, DNA, Viral, Herpesvirus 1, Human, pathogenicity, physiology, Herpesvirus 2, Human, Humans, Lung, cytology, Male, Membrane Fusion, Receptors, Virus, metabolism, Swine, Testis

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          Abstract

          We have determined if a defect at entry of the human pathogen herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) into cultured porcine cells extends to HSV-2 and if the poor susceptibility of porcine cells for these viruses is indicative of in vivo species tropism. HSV-1 replicates poorly in swine testis (ST) and other porcine cells which lack a functional non-heparan sulphate receptor(s) required for virus entry. By several criteria, ST cells resist infection by either HSV-1 or HSV-2. Infection can be restored if normal entry is bypassed by PEG-mediated virion-cell membrane fusion. Neither HSV serotype infects, replicates or produces clinical symptoms in infant pigs. No virus was isolated from any of multiple sites and seroconversion did not occur. The in vitro defect in porcine cells blocking HSV entry correlates with, and is likely to be at least partly responsible for, in vivo resistance of pigs to infection.

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          7561780

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