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      A soluble receptor for interleukin-1β encoded by vaccinia virus: A novel mechanism of virus modulation of the host response to infection

        ,

      Cell

      Elsevier BV

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          Abstract

          Vaccinia virus gene B15R is shown to encode an abundant, secretory glycoprotein that functions as a soluble interleukin-1 (IL-1) receptor. This IL-1 receptor has novel specificity since, in contrast with cellular counterparts, it binds only IL-1 beta and not IL-1 alpha or the natural competitor IL-1 receptor antagonist. The vaccinia IL-1 beta receptor is secreted when expressed in a baculovirus system and competitively inhibited binding of IL-1 beta to the natural receptor on T cells. Deletion of B15R from vaccinia virus accelerated the appearance of symptoms of illness and mortality in intranasally infected mice, suggesting that the blockade of IL-1 beta by vaccinia virus can diminish the systemic acute phase response to infection and modulate the severity of the disease. The IL-1 beta binding activity is present in other orthopoxviruses.

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          Most cited references 49

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          Ligand: a versatile computerized approach for characterization of ligand-binding systems.

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            The pUC plasmids, an M13mp7-derived system for insertion mutagenesis and sequencing with synthetic universal primers.

             J Messing,  J. Vieira (1982)
            A series of plasmid vectors containing the multiple cloning site (MCS7) of M13mp7 has been constructed. In one of these vectors a kanamycin-resistance marker has been inserted into the center of the symmetrical MCS7 to yield a restriction-site-mobilizing element (RSM). The drug-resistance marker can be cleaved out of this vector with any of the restriction enzymes that recognize a site of the flanking sequences of the RSM to generate an RSM with either various sticky ends or blunt ends. These fragments can be used for insertion mutagenesis of any target molecule with compatible restriction sites. Insertion mutants are selected by their resistance to kanamycin. When the drug-resistance marker is removed with PstI, a small in-frame insertion can be generated. In addition, two new MCSs having single restriction sites have been formed by altering the symmetrical structure of MCS7. The resulting plasmids pUC8 and pUC9 allow one to clone doubly digested restriction fragments separately with both orientations in respect to the lac promoter. The terminal sequences of any DNA cloned in these plasmids can be characterized using the universal M13 primers.
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              [1] Production of single-stranded plasmid DNA

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Cell
                Cell
                Elsevier BV
                00928674
                October 1992
                October 1992
                : 71
                : 1
                : 153-167
                Article
                10.1016/0092-8674(92)90274-G
                1394428
                66cdb3e1-75da-4692-8fdd-70513140220c
                © 1992

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