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      ASYMPTOMATIC ENDEMIC ROTAVIRUS INFECTIONS IN THE NEWBORN

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      Lancet (London, England)

      Published by Elsevier Ltd.

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          Abstract

          Between May 1, 1976, and May 14, 1977, 343 (32·5%) of 1056 5-day-old babies in newborn nurseries excreted rotaviruses. The infection-rate was highest during winter (49%). 76% of infected babies at this time were bottle-fed. 41% of neonates excreted low amounts of virus (10 8 particles/g fæces); older children tended to excrete >10 10 particles/g fæces. Infected breast-fed babies excreted less virus than those who were bottle-fed. Stools of breast-fed babies often contained clumps of complete "smooth" rotavirus particles. When the newborn nurseries were transferred to a newly built hospital wing, infection appeared in the new wards, including those admitting only new patients, within a short period. Infection was either mild (8%) or symptomless (92%), and even babies with symptoms required no treatment.

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          Most cited references 12

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          IMPORTANCE OF A NEW VIRUS IN ACUTE SPORADIC ENTERITIS IN CHILDREN

          In a year-long survey of children admitted with acute enteritis to hospital in Melbourne, Australia, an aetiological agent was found in approximately 75% of patients. During most months of the year a newly described virus belonging to the family Reoviridae was detected by electron microscopy of faecal extracts from more than 50% of patients. Recovery of this virus reached a peak (73%) during the winter. All age-group up to five years of age were susceptible to infection, which was occasionally fatal. Duration of infection was brief, with a probable incubation period of less than two days. Infections acquired in hospital were not uncommon. The name of this new virus is not decided. The name "duovirus" is proposed rather than "rotavirus" as previously suggested. There is already convincing evidence that this new virus will prove to be the most important aetiological agent of sporadic acute enteritis in young children.
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            Rotavirus infections in a maternity unit.

            Between May and August 1975, rotaviruses were detected in the stools of 76 out of 174 (44%) newborn babies in the maternity unit at this hospital. Infection occurred less frequently in breast-fed than in bottle-fed babies (P less than 0.001). However, only 7 out of 76 (8%) babies who excreted rotaviruses had symptoms and these were mild. Complement fixation tests did not show any apparent difference in the antibody titres or serological responses between mothers of rotavirus positive or negative babies. When 68 faecal extracts known to contain rotaviruses by electron microscopy were inoculated by centrifugation on to monolayers of continuous pig kidney cell cultures (IB-RS-2), rotavirus antigen was detected by immunofluorescence in 65 (95.5%) specimens, 58 being positive after centrifugation at 3000 g and a further 7 after centrifugation at 10 000 g. Antigen was first detected 6 hours after inoculation of specimens, maximum levels being detected at 24 hours.
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              Viral enteritis of calves

               G. Woode,  J. Bridger (1975)
              Calf diarrhoea is an important cause of economic loss. The aetiology of the disease is considered with particular reference to the role of viruses. Although many microbial organisms have been associated with the disease, there is doubt concerning their true role as causative agents. Two viruses, neonatal calf diarrhoea reovirus-life agent and calf coronavirus, have been discovered recently which appear to play an important role in many cases of diarrhoea and the evidence for considering them to be primary causes of the disease is discussed.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Lancet
                Lancet
                Lancet (London, England)
                Published by Elsevier Ltd.
                0140-6736
                1474-547X
                27 September 2003
                3 June 1978
                27 September 2003
                : 311
                : 8075
                : 1176-1178
                Affiliations
                Department of Virology, St. Thomas' Hospital and Medical School, London SE1 7EH, United Kingdon
                Article
                S0140-6736(78)90967-4
                10.1016/S0140-6736(78)90967-4
                7173156
                77944
                Copyright © 1978 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

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