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An extremely rich repertoire of bursting patterns during the development of cortical cultures

, 1 , 4 , 2 , , 3

BMC Neuroscience

BioMed Central

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      Abstract

      BackgroundWe have collected a comprehensive set of multi-unit data on dissociated cortical cultures. Previous studies of the development of the electrical activity of dissociated cultures of cortical neurons each focused on limited aspects of its dynamics, and were often based on small numbers of observed cultures. We followed 58 cultures of different densities – 3000 to 50,000 neurons on areas of 30 to 75 mm2 – growing on multi-electrode arrays (MEAs) during the first five weeks of their development.ResultsPlating density had a profound effect on development. While the aggregate spike detection rate scaled linearly with density, as expected from the number of cells in proximity to electrodes, dense cultures started to exhibit bursting behavior earlier in development than sparser cultures. Analysis of responses to electrical stimulation suggests that axonal outgrowth likewise occurred faster in dense cultures. After two weeks, the network activity was dominated by population bursts in most cultures. In contrast to previous reports, development continued with changing burst patterns throughout the observation period. Burst patterns were extremely varied, with inter-burst intervals between 1 and 300 s, different amounts of temporal clustering of bursts, and different firing rate profiles during bursts. During certain stages of development bursts were organized into tight clusters with highly conserved internal structure.ConclusionDissociated cultures of cortical cells exhibited a much richer repertoire of activity patterns than previously reported. Except for the very sparsest cultures, all cultures exhibited globally synchronized bursts, but bursting patterns changed over the course of development, and varied considerably between preparations. This emphasizes the importance of using multiple preparations – not just multiple cultures from one preparation – in any study involving neuronal cultures.These results are based on 963 half-hour-long recordings. To encourage further investigation of the rich range of behaviors exhibited by cortical cells in vitro, we are making the data available to other researchers, together with Matlab code to facilitate access.

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      Most cited references 33

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      Neuronal avalanches in neocortical circuits.

      Networks of living neurons exhibit diverse patterns of activity, including oscillations, synchrony, and waves. Recent work in physics has shown yet another mode of activity in systems composed of many nonlinear units interacting locally. For example, avalanches, earthquakes, and forest fires all propagate in systems organized into a critical state in which event sizes show no characteristic scale and are described by power laws. We hypothesized that a similar mode of activity with complex emergent properties could exist in networks of cortical neurons. We investigated this issue in mature organotypic cultures and acute slices of rat cortex by recording spontaneous local field potentials continuously using a 60 channel multielectrode array. Here, we show that propagation of spontaneous activity in cortical networks is described by equations that govern avalanches. As predicted by theory for a critical branching process, the propagation obeys a power law with an exponent of -3/2 for event sizes, with a branching parameter close to the critical value of 1. Simulations show that a branching parameter at this value optimizes information transmission in feedforward networks, while preventing runaway network excitation. Our findings suggest that "neuronal avalanches" may be a generic property of cortical networks, and represent a mode of activity that differs profoundly from oscillatory, synchronized, or wave-like network states. In the critical state, the network may satisfy the competing demands of information transmission and network stability.
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        Synaptic modification by correlated activity: Hebb's postulate revisited.

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        Correlated spiking of pre- and postsynaptic neurons can result in strengthening or weakening of synapses, depending on the temporal order of spiking. Recent findings indicate that there are narrow and cell type-specific temporal windows for such synaptic modification and that the generally accepted input- (or synapse-) specific rule for modification appears not to be strictly adhered to. Spike timing-dependent modifications, together with selective spread of synaptic changes, provide a set of cellular mechanisms that are likely to be important for the development and functioning of neural networks. When an axon of cell A is near enough to excite cell B or repeatedly or consistently takes part in firing it, some growth or metabolic change takes place in one or both cells such that A's efficiency, as one of the cells firing B, is increased.
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          Blood-brain barrier structure and function and the challenges for CNS drug delivery.

           N. Abbott (2013)
          The neurons of the central nervous system (CNS) require precise control of their bathing microenvironment for optimal function, and an important element in this control is the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The BBB is formed by the endothelial cells lining the brain microvessels, under the inductive influence of neighbouring cell types within the 'neurovascular unit' (NVU) including astrocytes and pericytes. The endothelium forms the major interface between the blood and the CNS, and by a combination of low passive permeability and presence of specific transport systems, enzymes and receptors regulates molecular and cellular traffic across the barrier layer. A number of methods and models are available for examining BBB permeation in vivo and in vitro, and can give valuable information on the mechanisms by which therapeutic agents and constructs permeate, ways to optimize permeation, and implications for drug discovery, delivery and toxicity. For treating lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs), models can be included that mimic aspects of the disease, including genetically-modified animals, and in vitro models can be used to examine the effects of cells of the NVU on the BBB under pathological conditions. For testing CNS drug delivery, several in vitro models now provide reliable prediction of penetration of drugs including large molecules and artificial constructs with promising potential in treating LSDs. For many of these diseases it is still not clear how best to deliver appropriate drugs to the CNS, and a concerted approach using a variety of models and methods can give critical insights and indicate practical solutions.
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            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            [1 ]Department of Physics, California Institute of Technology, Caltech 103-33, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA
            [2 ]Department of Physics, California Institute of Technology, Caltech 256-48, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA
            [3 ]Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University, 313 Ferst Drive, Atlanta, GA 30332-0535, USA
            [4 ]Present address: Division of Biological Sciences, University of California at San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0357, USA
            Contributors
            Journal
            BMC Neurosci
            BMC Neuroscience
            BioMed Central (London )
            1471-2202
            2006
            7 February 2006
            : 7
            : 11
            1420316
            1471-2202-7-11
            16464257
            10.1186/1471-2202-7-11
            Copyright © 2006 Wagenaar et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

            This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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            Research Article

            Neurosciences

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