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      Authoritarian Populism in Indonesia: The Role of the Political Campaign Industry in Engineering Consent and Coercion

      1 , 2
      Journal of Current Southeast Asian Affairs
      SAGE Publications

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          Abstract

          All around the globe, populism has become increasingly prominent in democratic societies in the developed and developing world. Scholars have attributed this rise at a response to the systematic reproduction of social inequalities entwined with processes of neoliberal globalisation, within which all countries are inextricably and dynamically linked. However, to theorise populism properly, we must look at its manifestations in countries other than the West. By taking the case of Indonesia, the third largest democracy and the largest economy in Southeast Asia, this article critically analyses the role of the political campaign industry in mobilising narratives in electoral discourses. We use the Gramscian notion of consent and coercion, in which the shaping of populist narratives relies on mechanisms of persuasion using mass and social media. Such mechanisms allow the transformation of political discourses in conjunction with oligarchic power struggle. Within this struggle, political campaigners narrate the persona of political elites, while cyber armies divide and polarise, to manufacture allegiance and agitation among the majority of young voters as part of a shifting social base. As such, we argue that, together, the narratives – through engineering consent and coercion – construct authoritarian populism that pits two crowds of “the people” against each other, while aligning them with different sections of the “elite.”

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          A Brief History of Neoliberalism

          Neoliberalism--the doctrine that market exchange is an ethic in itself, capable of acting as a guide for all human action--has become dominant in both thought and practice throughout much of the world since 1970 or so. Writing for a wide audience, David Harvey, author of The New Imperialism and The Condition of Postmodernity, here tells the political-economic story of where neoliberalization came from and how it proliferated on the world stage. Through critical engagement with this history, he constructs a framework, not only for analyzing the political and economic dangers that now surround us, but also for assessing the prospects for the more socially just alternatives being advocated by many oppositional movements.
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              The hall road to renewal: Thatcherism and the crisis of the left

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Current Southeast Asian Affairs
                Journal of Current Southeast Asian Affairs
                SAGE Publications
                1868-1034
                1868-4882
                December 2021
                July 29 2021
                December 2021
                : 40
                : 3
                : 436-460
                Affiliations
                [1 ] Faculty of Social and Political Sciences, Universitas Indonesia (University of Indonesia), Depok, West Java, Indonesia
                [2 ] Faculty of Business and Communication, Swiss German University, Indonesia
                Article
                10.1177/18681034211027885
                67395074-683a-4b55-8d67-0c6471f687d2
                © 2021

                https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

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