0
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found

      Biomolecular Markers of Malignancy in Human Uveal Melanoma: The Role of the Cadherin-Catenin Complex and Gene Expression Profiling

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          In recent years there has been a trend towards conservative management of uveal melanoma (UM), aimed at preserving the eye and vision. Despite improvements with this approach, recurrent tumour and metastatic disease still occur, and the management remains problematic. As a result of these limitations, there is interest in gaining a greater understanding of molecular changes associated with aggressive disease patterns in UM. This might result in new, more effective and less toxic therapies as well as provide prognostic information for defining subgroups of patients with a less favourable prognosis as potential candidates for adjuvant therapies. Accumulating evidence over the past decade suggests that disturbance in the cadherin-catenin adhesion complex is critical in the process leading to invasion and metastasis of many cancers. The recent advent of DNA micro-array technology now offers an unprecedented ability to study these molecules and others associated with malignant transformation. In this mini-review, the aspects of tumour progression in which cadherin-catenin may be involved are dealt with along with the potential application of DNA micro-array technology to the problem in UM.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 23

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Molecular classification of cutaneous malignant melanoma by gene expression profiling.

          The most common human cancers are malignant neoplasms of the skin. Incidence of cutaneous melanoma is rising especially steeply, with minimal progress in non-surgical treatment of advanced disease. Despite significant effort to identify independent predictors of melanoma outcome, no accepted histopathological, molecular or immunohistochemical marker defines subsets of this neoplasm. Accordingly, though melanoma is thought to present with different 'taxonomic' forms, these are considered part of a continuous spectrum rather than discrete entities. Here we report the discovery of a subset of melanomas identified by mathematical analysis of gene expression in a series of samples. Remarkably, many genes underlying the classification of this subset are differentially regulated in invasive melanomas that form primitive tubular networks in vitro, a feature of some highly aggressive metastatic melanomas. Global transcript analysis can identify unrecognized subtypes of cutaneous melanoma and predict experimentally verifiable phenotypic characteristics that may be of importance to disease progression.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Genomic analysis of metastasis reveals an essential role for RhoC.

            The most damaging change during cancer progression is the switch from a locally growing tumour to a metastatic killer. This switch is believed to involve numerous alterations that allow tumour cells to complete the complex series of events needed for metastasis. Relatively few genes have been implicated in these events. Here we use an in vivo selection scheme to select highly metastatic melanoma cells. By analysing these cells on DNA arrays, we define a pattern of gene expression that correlates with progression to a metastatic phenotype. In particular, we show enhanced expression of several genes involved in extracellular matrix assembly and of a second set of genes that regulate, either directly or indirectly, the actin-based cytoskeleton. One of these, the small GTPase RhoC, enhances metastasis when overexpressed, whereas a dominant-negative Rho inhibits metastasis. Analysis of the phenotype of cells expressing dominant-negative Rho or RhoC indicates that RhoC is important in tumour cell invasion. The genomic approach allows us to identify families of genes involved in a process, not just single genes, and can indicate which molecular and cellular events might be important in complex biological processes such as metastasis.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              beta-catenin signaling and cancer.

               P. Morin (1999)
              Since its discovery as a protein associated with the cytoplasmic region of E-cadherin, beta-catenin has been shown to perform two apparently unrelated functions: it has a crucial role in cell-cell adhesion in addition to a signaling role as a component of the Wnt/wg pathway. Wnt/wg signaling results in beta-catenin accumulation and transcriptional activation of specific target genes during development. It is now apparent that deregulation of beta-catenin signaling is an important event in the genesis of a number of malignancies, such as colon cancer, melanoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, ovarian cancer, endometrial cancer, medulloblastoma pilomatricomas, and prostate cancer. beta-catenin mutations appear to be a crucial step in the progression of a subset of these cancers, suggesting an important role in the control of cellular proliferation or cell death. The APC/beta-catenin pathway is highly regulated and includes players such as GSK3-beta, CBP, Groucho, Axin, Conductin, and TCF. c-MYC and cyclin D1 were recently identified as a key transcriptional targets of this pathway and additional targets are likely to emerge. Published 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                OPH
                Ophthalmologica
                10.1159/issn.0030-3755
                Ophthalmologica
                S. Karger AG
                0030-3755
                1423-0267
                2003
                February 2003
                06 February 2003
                : 217
                : 1
                : 68-75
                Affiliations
                aOcular Oncology Unit, Save Sight Institute, University of Sydney, Australia; Departments of bOphthalmology and cMolecular Oncology, University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, Germany
                Article
                68239 Ophthalmologica 2003;217:68–75
                10.1159/000068239
                12566877
                © 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

                Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

                Page count
                Figures: 2, References: 71, Pages: 8
                Categories
                Original Paper

                Vision sciences, Ophthalmology & Optometry, Pathology

                Catenin, Cadherin, Uveal melanoma, DNA micro-array

                Comments

                Comment on this article