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      Consumo de drogas en jóvenes universitarios y su relación de riesgo y protección con los factores psicosociales Translated title: Drug use in college students and its relation to psychological factors of riks and protection

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          Abstract

          El artículo presenta una investigación descriptiva y no experimental que identificó el consumo de drogas legales e ilegales y los factores psicosociales de riesgo y de protección relacionados con el consumo. La muestra fue de 763 universitarios de Cali, Colombia. Se diseñó y validó un cuestionario que identifica el consumo de cuatro drogas ilegales, dos legales y 13 factores psicosociales. Se encontró que la droga legal más consumida es el alcohol y la ilegal es la marihuana. Además, se estableció una asociación significativa de los factores psicosociales de riesgo y protección para el consumo de las drogas legales (alcohol c2 = 16,54, p = 0,000; tabaco c2 = 39,07, p = 0,000) e ilegales (marihuana c2 = 28,41, p = 0,000; éxtasis c2 = 17,04, p = 0,000; opiáceos c2 = 6,77, p = 0,034; y cocaína c2 = 8,89, p = 0,012). Se asociaron particularmente para protección y riesgo de consumo con todas las drogas, los factores: comportamientos perturbadores, autocontrol, preconceptos y valoración de las sustancias y relación con consumidores.

          Translated abstract

          The paper presents a non-experimental and descriptive research, aimed to identify the use of legal and illegal psychoactive drugs and the psychosocial associated risk and protective factors in a sample of 763 college students from Cali, Colombia. A questionnaire to evaluate the use of 4 illegal drugs, 2 legal drugs and 13 psychosocial factors was designed and validated. It was found that the legal drug with a higher level of consume was alcohol and the illegal drug was marijuana. The results show a significant association of psychosocial risk and protective factors with the use of both legal drugs (alcohol c2 = 16,54, p = 0,000; tobacco c2 = 39,07, p = 0,000) and the use of all the illegal drugs (marijuana c2 = 28,41, p = 0,000; ecstasy c2 = 17,04, p = 0,000; opiates c2 = 6,77, p = 0,034; and cocaine c2 = 8,89, p = 0,012). The associated factors for all drugs are specifically: disruptive behaviors, self-control, beliefs and valuation of PAS and the relation with consumers.

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          Most cited references 106

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          Informe mundial sobre la violencia y la salud

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            Cannabis use and mental health in young people: cohort study.

            To determine whether cannabis use in adolescence predisposes to higher rates of depression and anxiety in young adulthood. Seven wave cohort study over six years. 44 schools in the Australian state of Victoria. A statewide secondary school sample of 1601 students aged 14-15 followed for seven years. Interview measure of depression and anxiety (revised clinical interview schedule) at wave 7. Some 60% of participants had used cannabis by the age of 20; 7% were daily users at that point. Daily use in young women was associated with an over fivefold increase in the odds of reporting a state of depression and anxiety after adjustment for intercurrent use of other substances (odds ratio 5.6, 95% confidence interval 2.6 to 12). Weekly or more frequent cannabis use in teenagers predicted an approximately twofold increase in risk for later depression and anxiety (1.9, 1.1 to 3.3) after adjustment for potential baseline confounders. In contrast, depression and anxiety in teenagers predicted neither later weekly nor daily cannabis use. Frequent cannabis use in teenage girls predicts later depression and anxiety, with daily users carrying the highest risk. Given recent increasing levels of cannabis use, measures to reduce frequent and heavy recreational use seem warranted.
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              Psychological and social sequelae of cannabis and other illicit drug use by young people: a systematic review of longitudinal, general population studies.

              Use of illicit drugs, particularly cannabis, by young people is widespread and is associated with several types of psychological and social harm. These relations might not be causal. Causal relations would suggest that recreational drug use is a substantial public health problem. Non-causal relations would suggest that harm-reduction policy based on prevention of drug use is unlikely to produce improvements in public health. Cross-sectional evidence cannot clarify questions of causality; longitudinal or interventional evidence is needed. Past reviews have generally been non-systematic, have often included cross-sectional data, and have underappreciated the extent of methodological problems associated with interpretation. We did a systematic review of general population longitudinal studies reporting associations between illicit drug use by young people and psychosocial harm. We identified 48 relevant studies, of which 16 were of higher quality and provided the most robust evidence. Fairly consistent associations were noted between cannabis use and both lower educational attainment and increased reported use of other illicit drugs. Less consistent associations were noted between cannabis use and both psychological health problems and problematic behaviour. All these associations seemed to be explicable in terms of non-causal mechanisms. Available evidence does not strongly support an important causal relation between cannabis use by young people and psychosocial harm, but cannot exclude the possibility that such a relation exists. The lack of evidence of robust causal relations prevents the attribution of public health detriments to illicit drug use. In view of the extent of illicit drug use, better evidence is needed.
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                Author and article information

                Affiliations
                [1 ] Pontificia Universidad Javeriana
                Contributors
                Role: ND
                Role: ND
                Role: ND
                Role: ND
                Journal
                rups
                Universitas Psychologica
                Univ. Psychol.
                Pontificia Universidad Javeriana (Bogotá )
                1657-9267
                December 2006
                : 5
                : 3
                : 521-534
                S1657-92672006000300008

                http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                Product
                Product Information: SciELO PEPSIC
                Categories
                PSYCHOLOGY, MULTIDISCIPLINARY

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