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      Tapentadol in the management of cancer pain: current evidence and future perspectives

      1 , 2

      Journal of Pain Research

      Dove Medical Press

      cancer pain, tapentadol, neuropathic pain

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          Abstract

          Thanks to the progress in early diagnosis and treatment of cancer, the life expectancy of cancer patients has now increased. Patients are, therefore, more likely to experience their individual cancer pain as a chronic pain. As a consequence, long-term treatment of cancer-related pain and oncological therapy-related pain are a major need for all patients and a challenge to all healthcare professionals. Tapentadol is a centrally acting analgesic drug characterized by two synergistic mechanisms of action, since it acts at the µ-opioid receptor (MOR) and inhibits noradrenalin re-uptake (NRI). Therefore, tapentadol has been considered the first of a new class of drugs, MOR-NRI. Tapentadol has been tested in different populations of cancer patients (opioid-naive and -pretreated), such as those with pain of mixed etiology, patients with pain from hematological malignancies and patients experiencing pain conditions due to anticancer treatment. According to available evidence, tapentadol prolonged release was well tolerated and effective in cancer pain patients. In randomized, double-blind and active-controlled trials it proved non-inferior to standard opioids like morphine or oxycodone in the management of moderate-to-severe cancer pain, both in opioid-naive and in opioid-pretreated patients. The good analgesic efficacy may be partly due to the action of tapentadol on neuropathic pain components. Together with the low rate of gastrointestinal adverse effects and the overall favorable safety profile, tapentadol can be considered a good option in cancer pain patients, who can suffer frequently from nausea, vomiting, constipation or other events that further reduce their quality of life.

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          Most cited references 29

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          Use of opioid analgesics in the treatment of cancer pain: evidence-based recommendations from the EAPC.

          Here we provide the updated version of the guidelines of the European Association for Palliative Care (EAPC) on the use of opioids for the treatment of cancer pain. The update was undertaken by the European Palliative Care Research Collaborative. Previous EAPC guidelines were reviewed and compared with other currently available guidelines, and consensus recommendations were created by formal international expert panel. The content of the guidelines was defined according to several topics, each of which was assigned to collaborators who developed systematic literature reviews with a common methodology. The recommendations were developed by a writing committee that combined the evidence derived from the systematic reviews with the panellists' evaluations in a co-authored process, and were endorsed by the EAPC Board of Directors. The guidelines are presented as a list of 16 evidence-based recommendations developed according to the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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            Management of cancer pain: ESMO Clinical Practice Guidelines.

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              Animal models of bone cancer pain: systematic review and meta-analyses.

              Pain can significantly decrease the quality of life of patients with advanced cancer. Current treatment strategies often provide inadequate analgesia and unacceptable side effects. Animal models of bone cancer pain are used in the development of novel pharmacological approaches. Here we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of publications describing in vivo modelling of bone cancer pain in which behavioural, general health, macroscopic, histological, biochemical, or electrophysiological outcomes were reported and compared to appropriate controls. In all, 150 publications met our inclusion criteria, describing 38 different models of bone cancer pain. Reported methodological quality was low; only 31% of publications reported blinded assessment of outcome, and 11% reported random allocation to group. No publication reported a sample size calculation. Studies that reported measures to reduce bias reported smaller differences in behavioural outcomes between tumour-bearing and control animals, and studies that presented a statement regarding a conflict of interest reported larger differences in behavioural outcomes. Larger differences in behavioural outcomes were reported in female animals, when cancer cells were injected into either the tibia or femur, and when MatLyLu prostate or Lewis Lung cancer cells were used. Mechanical-evoked pain behaviours were most commonly reported; however, the largest difference was observed in spontaneous pain behaviours. In the spinal cord astrocyte activation and increased levels of Substance P receptor internalisation, c-Fos, dynorphin, tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β have been reported in bone cancer pain models, suggesting several potential therapeutic targets. However, the translational impact of animal models on clinical pain research could be enhanced by improving methodological quality. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                J Pain Res
                J Pain Res
                Journal of Pain Research
                Journal of Pain Research
                Dove Medical Press
                1178-7090
                2019
                16 May 2019
                : 12
                : 1553-1560
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Special Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, Medical University, Vienna General Hospital, Vienna, Austria, hans-georg.kress@ 123456meduniwien.ac.at
                [2 ]Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences and Biotechnologies, Unit of Anesthesia, Intensive Care and Pain Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome, Polo Pontino, Latina, Italy
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Hans G Kress, Department of Special Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, Medical University, Vienna General Hospital, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna, Austria, Email hans-georg.kress@ 123456meduniwien.ac.at
                Article
                jpr-12-1553
                10.2147/JPR.S191543
                6526916
                © 2019 Kress and Coluzzi. This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited

                The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed.

                Categories
                Review

                Anesthesiology & Pain management

                neuropathic pain, tapentadol, cancer pain

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