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      Real-World Data of Pyrotinib-Based Therapy in Metastatic HER2-Positive Breast Cancer: Promising Efficacy in Lapatinib-Treated Patients and in Brain Metastasis

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          Abstract

          Purpose

          Pyrotinib is a newly-developed irreversible pan-ErbB receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor. This study reported the first real-world data of pyrotinib-based therapy in metastatic human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive breast cancer (BC), focusing on efficacy in lapatinib-treated patients and in brain metastasis.

          Materials and Methods

          One hundred thirteen patients with metastatic HER2-positive BC treated with pyrotinib-based therapy in Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center under non-clinical trial settings from September 1, 2018 to March 1, 2019 were included.

          Results

          Over half patients have received more than two lines of systematic therapy and exposed to two or more kinds of anti-HER2 agents. Most patients received a combined therapy, commonly of pyrotinib plus capecitabine, or vinorelbine or trastuzumab. Median progression-free survival (PFS) was 6.3 months (range, 5.54 to 7.06 months) and objective response rate (ORR) was 29.5%, with two patients (1.9%) achieving complete response. Lapatinib-naïve patients had significantly longer PFS than lapatinib-treated patients (9.0 months vs. 5.4 months, p=0.001). ORR for lapatinib-treated patients was 23.2%. Thirty-one of 113 patients have brain metastasis. Median PFS was 6.7 months and intracranial ORR was 28%. For patients without concurrent radiotherapy and/or brain surgery, the ORR was very low (6.3%). But for patients receiving concurrent radiotherapy and/or brain surgery, the ORR was 66.7%, and three patients achieved complete response. Most common adverse event was diarrhea.

          Conclusion

          Pyrotinib-based therapy demonstrated promising effects in metastatic HER2-positive BC and showed activity in lapatinib-treated patients. For patients with brain metastasis, pyrotinib-based regimen without radiotherapy showed limited efficacy, but when combined with radiotherapy it showed promising intracranial control.

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          Most cited references 16

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          Central nervous system metastases in patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer: incidence, treatment, and survival in patients from registHER.

          registHER is a prospective, observational study of 1,023 newly diagnosed HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer (MBC) patients. Baseline characteristics of patients with and without central nervous system (CNS) metastases were compared; incidence, time to development, treatment, and survival after CNS metastases were assessed. Associations between treatment after CNS metastases and survival were evaluated. Of the 1,012 patients who had confirmed HER2-positive tumors, 377 (37.3%) had CNS metastases. Compared with patients with no CNS metastases, those with CNS metastases were younger and more likely to have hormone receptor-negative disease and higher disease burden. Median time to CNS progression among patients without CNS disease at initial MBC diagnosis (n = 302) was 13.3 months. Treatment with trastuzumab, chemotherapy, or surgery after CNS diagnosis was each associated with a statistically significant improvement in median overall survival (OS) following diagnosis of CNS disease (unadjusted analysis: trastuzumab vs. no trastuzumab, 17.5 vs. 3.8 months; chemotherapy vs. no chemotherapy, 16.4 vs. 3.7 months; and surgery vs. no surgery, 20.3 vs. 11.3 months). Although treatment with radiotherapy seemed to prolong median OS (13.9 vs. 8.4 months), the difference was not significant (P = 0.134). Results of multivariable proportional hazards analyses confirmed the independent significant effects of trastuzumab and chemotherapy (HR = 0.33, P < 0.001; HR = 0.64, P = 0.002, respectively). The effects of surgery and radiotherapy did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.062 and P = 0.898, respectively). For patients with HER2-positive MBC evaluated in registHER, the use of trastuzumab, chemotherapy, and surgery following CNS metastases were each associated with longer survival.
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            Trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1) versus lapatinib plus capecitabine in patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer and central nervous system metastases: a retrospective, exploratory analysis in EMILIA†

             I E Krop,  N Lin,  K Blackwell (2014)
            In a retrospective analysis of the EMILIA study, the rate of central nervous system (CNS) progression in patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive metastatic breast cancer was similar for trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1) and for capecitabine–lapatinib. In patients with treated, asymptomatic CNS metastases at baseline, T-DM1 was associated with significantly improved overall survival versus capecitabine–lapatinib.
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              Breast Cancer Treatment

              Breast cancer will be diagnosed in 12% of women in the United States over the course of their lifetimes and more than 250 000 new cases of breast cancer were diagnosed in the United States in 2017. This review focuses on current approaches and evolving strategies for local and systemic therapy of breast cancer.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Cancer Res Treat
                Cancer Res Treat
                CRT
                Cancer Research and Treatment : Official Journal of Korean Cancer Association
                Korean Cancer Association
                1598-2998
                2005-9256
                October 2020
                24 April 2020
                : 52
                : 4
                : 1059-1066
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Medical Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, China
                [2 ]Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai, China
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Xichun Hu, MD, PhD Department of Medical Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center and Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, No. 270, Dong’an Road, Shanghai 200032, China Tel: 86-21-64175590 Fax: 86-21-54561523 E-mail: xchu2009@ 123456hotmail.com
                Co-correspondence: Jian Zhang, MD, PhD Department of Medical Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center and Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, No. 270, Dong’an Road, Shanghai 200032, China Tel: 86-21-64175590 Fax: 86-21-54561523 E-mail: syner2000@ 123456163.com
                [*]

                Ying Lin and Mingxi Lin contributed equally to this work.

                Article
                crt-2019-633
                10.4143/crt.2019.633
                7577809
                32340083
                Copyright © 2020 by the Korean Cancer Association

                This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

                Categories
                Original Article
                Breast Cancer

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