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      Disorders of the optic tract, radiation, and occipital lobe.

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          Abstract

          Disorders of the optic tract, lateral geniculate nucleus, optic radiation, and occipital lobe - collectively called the retrochiasmal visual pathways - are commonly encountered in neurological practice, and may result from a number of causes. The major visual morbidity of retrochiasmal disease is the homonymous visual field defect, which is found in approximately 8% of stroke patients. A homonymous visual field defect may have profound legal, occupational, and financial consequences for patients, with many patients unable to read, drive, or return to work after sustaining retrochiasmal damage. Some homonymous hemianopias may improve, usually within days of a cerebral infarction, but remain stable after 3 months. Although treatment options are limited to those of the underlying cause, appropriate counseling and low-vision rehabilitation may be helpful.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Handb Clin Neurol
          Handbook of clinical neurology
          Elsevier BV
          0072-9752
          0072-9752
          2011
          : 102
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Departments of Ophthalmology, Neurology, and Neurological Surgery, Neuro-ophthalmology Unit, Emory Eye Center, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA.
          Article
          B978-0-444-52903-9.00014-5
          10.1016/B978-0-444-52903-9.00014-5
          21601068
          68534759-ea24-4f0a-91ae-12db655aff59
          Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
          History

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