Blog
About

4
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Metabolic syndrome among residents of Mizan-Aman town, South West Ethiopia, 2017: A cross sectional study

      1 , * , 2 , 3

      PLoS ONE

      Public Library of Science

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Introduction

          Globally, it is estimated that around 20–25% adult population has metabolic syndrome. Individuals who have metabolic syndrome are up to five times more susceptible for chronic diseases than those who have no metabolic syndrome. In Ethiopia there is no sufficient information regarding the magnitude and factors of metabolic syndrome. The aim of this study is to assess prevalence and associated factors of metabolic syndrome among residents of Mizan-Aman town, South West, Ethiopia.

          Methods

          The community based cross-sectional study was held at Mizan-Aman town residents. Systematic random sampling was employed to select each household and lottery method was used to select one individual from the household. Data were cleaned, coded and entered by EPI-INFO version 3.5.4 and were transported to SPSS version 20 for further analysis. To indicate the strength of association, odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were used.

          Results

          In this study from a total of 558 respondents 534 were completed the interview correctly, which gives a response rate of 95.7%. The overall prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 9.6%. Multivariate logistic regression revealed that physical inactivity [AOR = 2.61, 95% CI (1.22, 5.58)], age from 18 to 28 years [AOR = 0.36, 95% CI (0.14, 0.90)], being male [AOR = 0.46, 95% CI (0.22, 0.96)] and educational status with cannot write and read [AOR = 0.15, 95% CI (0.04,0.53)], from grade 1 to 8 [AOR = 0. 17, (0.11,0.55)], from grade 9 to12 [AOR = 0.11, (0.03, 0.38)] and from diploma to degree [AOR = 0. 13, (0.01, 0.36)] were significantly associated with metabolic syndrome.

          Conclusion

          The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in this study was found to be high. Age, physical activity, educational status and sex were significantly associated with metabolic syndrome. Physical activity was found to be the means of metabolic syndrome prevention.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 20

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Prevalence of the metabolic syndrome defined by the International Diabetes Federation among adults in the U.S.

           Earl S. Ford (2005)
          The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) has proposed a new definition of the metabolic syndrome that emphasizes central adiposity as determined by ethnic group-specific thresholds of waist circumference. The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of this syndrome using the IDF definition among U.S. adults and to compare it with the prevalence estimated using the definition of the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP). A total of 3,601 men and women aged > or =20 years from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2002 were included in the analyses. Based on the NCEP definition, the unadjusted prevalence of the metabolic syndrome was 34.5 +/- 0.9% (percent +/- SE) among all participants, 33.7 +/- 1.6% among men, and 35.4 +/- 1.2% among women. Based on the IDF definition, the unadjusted prevalence of the metabolic syndrome was 39.0 +/- 1.1% among all participants, 39.9 +/- 1.7% among men, and 38.1 +/- 1.2% among women. The IDF definition led to higher estimates of prevalence in all of the demographic groups, especially among Mexican-American men. The two definitions similarly classified approximately 93% of the participants as having or not having the metabolic syndrome. In the U.S., the use of the IDF definition of the metabolic syndrome leads to a higher prevalence estimate of the metabolic syndrome than the estimate based on the NCEP definition.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Prevalence of metabolic syndrome in an urban population: Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study.

            The aim of the present investigation was to determine the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome among 103,68 of the adults (4,397 men and 5,971 women) aged 20 years and over, participating in the Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study. The metabolic syndrome was defined by the presence of three or more of the following components: abdominal obesity, hypertriglyceridemia, low HDL-C, high blood pressure, and high fasting glucose. The unadjusted prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the study population was 30.1% (CI 95%: 29.2-31.0) and age-standardized prevalence was 33.7% (CI 95%: 32.8-34.6). The prevalence increased with age in both sexes. The metabolic syndrome was more commonly seen in women than in men (42% vs. 24%, P<0.001). Low HDL-C was the most common metabolic abnormality in both sexes. Except for high FPG, all abnormalities were more common in women than in men (P<0.001). Most of those with metabolic syndrome had three components of the syndrome (58%), 33% had four, and 9% had five components. This report on the metabolic syndrome from Iran shows a high prevalence of this disorder. Efforts on promoting healthy diets, physical activity, and blood pressure control must be undertaken.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              The metabolic syndrome: a global public health problem and a new definition.

              The constellation of metabolic abnormalities including centrally distributed obesity, decreased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), elevated triglycerides, elevated blood pressure (BP), and hyperglycaemia is known as the metabolic syndrome. Associated with a 3 fold and 2 fold increase in type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD), respectively, it is thought to be a driver of the modern day epidemics of diabetes and CVD and has become a major public health challenge around the world. Since its initial description, several definitions of the syndrome have emerged. Each of these definitions used differing sets of criteria, which reflected contrasting views on pathogenic mechanisms and the need for clinical usefulness. The use of these definitions to conduct research into the metabolic syndrome in diverse populations resulted in wide ranging prevalence rates, inconsistencies and confusion, and spurred on the vigorous debate regarding how the metabolic syndrome should be defined. In response to this controversy, the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) has recently proposed a new definition, which is applicable to populations around the world. It is envisaged that the development of the new definition for the metabolic syndrome will help resolve the confusion caused by the number of earlier attempts to define this important entity.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Role: ConceptualizationRole: Formal analysisRole: MethodologyRole: Writing – original draft
                Role: Data curationRole: InvestigationRole: Writing – review & editing
                Role: Data curationRole: SupervisionRole: Visualization
                Role: Editor
                Journal
                PLoS One
                PLoS ONE
                plos
                plosone
                PLoS ONE
                Public Library of Science (San Francisco, CA USA )
                1932-6203
                31 January 2019
                2019
                : 14
                : 1
                Affiliations
                [1 ] Department of Nursing, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Bahir Dar University, Bahir Dar, Ethiopia
                [2 ] Department of psychiatry, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Bahir Dar University, Bahir Dar, Ethiopia
                [3 ] Department of Medicine, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Wachemo University, Hossana, Ethiopia
                University of Maiduguri College of Medical Sciences, NIGERIA
                Author notes

                Competing Interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

                Article
                PONE-D-18-19144
                10.1371/journal.pone.0210969
                6354988
                30703130
                © 2019 Kerie et al

                This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

                Page count
                Figures: 0, Tables: 5, Pages: 9
                Product
                Funding
                This research was funded by Mizan- Tepi university. MTU@ 123456edu.et .
                Categories
                Research Article
                Medicine and Health Sciences
                Metabolic Disorders
                Metabolic Syndrome
                Medicine and Health Sciences
                Public and Occupational Health
                Physical Activity
                People and Places
                Population Groupings
                Educational Status
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Nutrition
                Diet
                Alcohol Consumption
                Medicine and Health Sciences
                Nutrition
                Diet
                Alcohol Consumption
                People and Places
                Geographical Locations
                Africa
                Ethiopia
                Biology and Life Sciences
                Physiology
                Physiological Parameters
                Body Weight
                Obesity
                Medicine and Health Sciences
                Physiology
                Physiological Parameters
                Body Weight
                Obesity
                Medicine and Health Sciences
                Vascular Medicine
                Blood Pressure
                Medicine and Health Sciences
                Cardiovascular Medicine
                Cardiovascular Diseases
                Custom metadata
                All data underlying the study are within the paper and its Supporting Information files.

                Uncategorized

                Comments

                Comment on this article