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      Profile of belatacept and its potential role in prevention of graft rejection following renal transplantation

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          Abstract

          The last several decades have witnessed a substantial decrease in the incidence of acute allograft rejection following kidney transplantation, although commensurate improvements in long-term graft function have not been realized. As a result, the primary focus of new immunosuppressive drug development has expanded to include ease of use and improved side effect profile, including reduced nephrotoxicity, in addition to the more traditional goal of improved short-term outcomes. A number of novel drugs are currently under investigation in Phase I, II, or III clinical trials, primarily to replace the nephrotoxic but highly effective calcineurin inhibitors. Belatacept is a humanized antibody that inhibits T cell costimulation and has shown encouraging results in multiple Phase II and III trials. This article reviews the mechanism of action of belatacept, as well as published and preliminary results of the Phase I–III clinical trials involving this novel immunosuppressive agent.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Drug Des Devel Ther
          Drug Design, Development and Therapy
          Drug Design, Development and Therapy
          Dove Medical Press
          1177-8881
          2010
          01 December 2010
          : 4
          : 375-382
          Affiliations
          Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA
          Author notes
          Correspondence: Karl L Womer, Ross 947, 720 Rutland Avenue, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA, Tel +1 410 502 3707, Fax +1 410 502 5944, Email kwomer1@ 123456jhmi.edu
          Article
          dddt-4-375
          10.2147/DDDT.S10432
          2998809
          21151624
          © 2010 Gupta and Womer, publisher and licensee Dove Medical Press Ltd.

          This is an Open Access article which permits unrestricted noncommercial use, provided the original work is properly cited.

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