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      A new cucurbit[10]uril-based AIE fluorescent supramolecular polymer for cellular imaging

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          Abstract

          The synthesis of the AIE fluorescent supramolecular polymer TPE-B@Q[10] is reported. This system exhibits excellent blue emission properties, good biocompatibility and was successfully employed for cytoplasmic imaging of cells.

          Abstract

          To further advance the development of cucurbit[10]uril-based supramolecular biomaterials, an AIE fluorescent supramolecular polymer (TPE-B@Q[10]) was constructed from the newly synthesized AIE molecule TPE-B and Q[10] via host–guest interactions in a host/guest ratio of 2 : 1. TPE-B@Q[10] not only has excellent blue fluorescence emission properties, but also possesses good biocompatibility and low toxicity. Therefore, TPE-B@Q[10] was successfully used for cytoplasmic imaging of cells. Flow cytometry further illustrated that Q[10] is capable of generating an alternative way to increase the fluorescence of TPE-B and its characteristic pattern for cellular imaging. This work provides a theoretical basis for promoting the application of cucurbit[ n]uril-based supramolecular polymers in cell biology, and promotes the further development of cucurbit[ n]uril chemistry.

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          Aggregation-induced emission of 1-methyl-1,2,3,4,5-pentaphenylsilole

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            Functional supramolecular polymers.

            Supramolecular polymers can be random and entangled coils with the mechanical properties of plastics and elastomers, but with great capacity for processability, recycling, and self-healing due to their reversible monomer-to-polymer transitions. At the other extreme, supramolecular polymers can be formed by self-assembly among designed subunits to yield shape-persistent and highly ordered filaments. The use of strong and directional interactions among molecular subunits can achieve not only rich dynamic behavior but also high degrees of internal order that are not known in ordinary polymers. They can resemble, for example, the ordered and dynamic one-dimensional supramolecular assemblies of the cell cytoskeleton and possess useful biological and electronic functions.
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              Supramolecular Amphiphiles Based on Host-Guest Molecular Recognition Motifs.

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                MCFAC5
                Materials Chemistry Frontiers
                Mater. Chem. Front.
                Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC)
                2052-1537
                April 11 2022
                2022
                : 6
                : 8
                : 1021-1025
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Key Laboratory of Macrocyclic and Supramolecular Chemistry of Guizhou Province, Guizhou University, Guiyang 550025, China
                [2 ]State Key Laboratory of Functions and Applications of Medicinal Plants, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Guizhou Medical University, Guiyang 550014, China
                [3 ]Department of Chemistry, University of Hull, Hull HU6 7RX, UK
                Article
                10.1039/D2QM00084A
                68eb5846-207a-4540-b72d-4a1d908e92c1
                © 2022

                http://rsc.li/journals-terms-of-use

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