3
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Identification and mapping quantitative trait loci for stem reserve mobilisation in wheat (Triticum aestivumL.)

        , ,
      Cereal Research Communications
      Akademiai Kiado Zrt.

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references18

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Genetic analysis of grain protein-content, grain yield and thousand-kernel weight in bread wheat.

          Grain yield and grain protein content are two very important traits in bread wheat. They are controlled by genetic factors, but environmental conditions considerably affect their expression. The aim of this study was to determine the genetic basis of these two traits by analysis of a segregating population of 194 F(7) recombinant inbred lines derived from a cross between two wheat varieties, grown at six locations in France in 1999. A genetic map of 254 loci was constructed, covering about 75% of the bread wheat genome. QTLs were detected for grain protein-content (GPC), yield and thousand-kernel weight (TKW). 'Stable' QTLs (i.e. detected in at least four of the six locations) were identified for grain protein-content on chromosomes 2A, 3A, 4D and 7D, each explaining about 10% of the phenotypic variation of GPC. For yield, only one important QTL was found on chromosome 7D, explaining up to 15.7% of the phenotypic variation. For TKW, three QTLs were detected on chromosomes 2B, 5B and 7A for all environments. No negative relationships between QTLs for yield and GPC were observed. Factorial Regression on GxE interaction allowed determination of some genetic regions involved in the differential reaction of genotypes to specific climatic factors, such as mean temperature and the number of days with a maximum temperature above 25 degrees C during grain filling.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Advanced backcross QTL analysis for the identification of quantitative trait loci alleles from wild relatives of wheat ( Triticum aestivum L.).

            Advanced backcross QTL (AB-QTL) analysis was used to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for yield and yield components in a BC(2)F(2) population derived from a cross between the German winter wheat variety 'Prinz' and the synthetic wheat line W-7984 developed by CIMMYT. Two hundred and ten microsatellite markers were employed to genotype 72 pre-selected BC(2)F(2) plants and phenotypic data were collected for five agronomic traits from corresponding BC(2)F(3) families that were grown at four locations in Germany. Using single-marker regression and interval mapping, a total of 40 putative QTLs derived from W-7984 were detected, of which 11 were for yield, 16 for yield components, eight for ear emergence time and five for plant height. For 24 (60.0%) of them, alleles from the synthetic wheat W-7984 were associated with a positive effect on agronomic traits, despite the fact that synthetic wheat was overall inferior with respect to agronomic appearance and performance. The present study indicated that favorable QTL alleles could be transferred from wild relatives of wheat into an elite wheat variety for improvement of quantitative trait loci like yield by the advanced backcross QTL strategy and molecular breeding. To our knowledge, the results presented here were the first report on AB-QTL analysis in wheat.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Linkage between RFLP markers and genes affecting kernel hardness in wheat.

              A molecular-marker linkage map of wheat (Triticum aestivum L. em. Thell) provides a powerful tool for identifying genomic regions influencing breadmaking quality. A variance analysis for kernel hardness was conducted using 114 recombinant inbred lines (F7) from a cross between a synthetic and a cultivated wheat. The major gene involved in kernel hardness, ha (hard), known to be on chromosome arm 5DS, was found to be closely linked with the locus Xmta9 corresponding to the gene of puroindoline-a. This locus explained around 63% of the phenotypic variability but there was no evidence that puroindoline-a is the product of Ha (soft). Four additional regions located on chromosomes 2A, 2D, 5B, and 6D were shown to have single-factor effects on hardness, while three others situated on chromosomes 5A, 6D and 7A had interaction effects. Positive alleles were contributed by both parents. A three-marker model explains about 75% of the variation for this trait.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Cereal Research Communications
                Cereal Research Communications
                Akademiai Kiado Zrt.
                0133-3720
                1788-9170
                September 2007
                September 2007
                : 35
                : 3
                : 1367-1374
                Article
                10.1556/CRC.35.2007.3.1
                693e1fad-552c-42aa-ba70-05c5df9a5daa
                © 2007
                History

                Comments

                Comment on this article