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      Remark on digital accessibility: educational disparities define digital inclusion from adolescence onwards

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          Abstract

          Along with the digitalisation of societies and services, the accessibility of digital content has become the focus of attention. However, emphasis has been on technical accessibility, ignoring the large number of people suffering from cognitive challenges that are expected to increase as the population ages. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate that the problem affects not only the elderly but also the young. Utilising multivariate methods and a data set of 14,892 young Finns, the study examines the impact of educational disparities on young people’s digital usage and skills. It is observed that the level of education, the form of education and the regularity of the education path are related to differences in digital abilities of young people. Based on the results, the risks of being excluded from digital inclusion accumulate among adolescents for the youngest, but especially for those with a wide range of language, learning or motivational difficulties that manifest as delays in education path. As is known from previous research, such differences are expected to be reinforced in later life, threatening to become rather determinative.

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          Factors predicting the use of technology: findings from the Center for Research and Education on Aging and Technology Enhancement (CREATE).

          The successful adoption of technology is becoming increasingly important to functional independence. The present article reports findings from the Center for Research and Education on Aging and Technology Enhancement (CREATE) on the use of technology among community-dwelling adults. The sample included 1,204 individuals ranging in age from 18-91 years. All participants completed a battery that included measures of demographic characteristics, self-rated health, experience with technology, attitudes toward computers, and component cognitive abilities. Findings indicate that the older adults were less likely than younger adults to use technology in general, computers, and the World Wide Web. The results also indicate that computer anxiety, fluid intelligence, and crystallized intelligence were important predictors of the use of technology. The relationship between age and adoption of technology was mediated by cognitive abilities, computer self-efficacy, and computer anxiety. These findings are discussed in terms of training strategies to promote technology adoption. Copyright (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved.
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            Digital inequalities and why they matter

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              User experience - a research agenda

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                (View ORCID Profile)
                (View ORCID Profile)
                Journal
                Universal Access in the Information Society
                Univ Access Inf Soc
                Springer Science and Business Media LLC
                1615-5289
                1615-5297
                August 11 2022
                Article
                10.1007/s10209-022-00908-5
                69881e5d-0544-430c-8d7a-22a166abef57
                © 2022

                https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0

                https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0

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