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      A partially interpenetrated metal–organic framework for selective hysteretic sorption of carbon dioxide

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          Abstract

          The selective capture of carbon dioxide in porous materials has potential for the storage and purification of fuel and flue gases. However, adsorption capacities under dynamic conditions are often insufficient for practical applications, and strategies to enhance CO(2)-host selectivity are required. The unique partially interpenetrated metal-organic framework NOTT-202 represents a new class of dynamic material that undergoes pronounced framework phase transition on desolvation. We report temperature-dependent adsorption/desorption hysteresis in desolvated NOTT-202a that responds selectively to CO(2). The CO(2) isotherm shows three steps in the adsorption profile at 195 K, and stepwise filling of pores generated within the observed partially interpenetrated structure has been modelled by grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations. Adsorption of N(2), CH(4), O(2), Ar and H(2) exhibits reversible isotherms without hysteresis under the same conditions, and this allows capture of gases at high pressure, but selectively leaves CO(2) trapped in the nanopores at low pressure.

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          Most cited references 33

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          Ultrahigh porosity in metal-organic frameworks.

          Crystalline solids with extended non-interpenetrating three-dimensional crystal structures were synthesized that support well-defined pores with internal diameters of up to 48 angstroms. The Zn4O(CO2)6 unit was joined with either one or two kinds of organic link, 4,4',4''-[benzene-1,3,5-triyl-tris(ethyne-2,1-diyl)]tribenzoate (BTE), 4,4',44''-[benzene-1,3,5-triyl-tris(benzene-4,1-diyl)]tribenzoate (BBC), 4,4',44''-benzene-1,3,5-triyl-tribenzoate (BTB)/2,6-naphthalenedicarboxylate (NDC), and BTE/biphenyl-4,4'-dicarboxylate (BPDC), to give four metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), MOF-180, -200, -205, and -210, respectively. Members of this series of MOFs show exceptional porosities and gas (hydrogen, methane, and carbon dioxide) uptake capacities. For example, MOF-210 has Brunauer-Emmett-Teller and Langmuir surface areas of 6240 and 10,400 square meters per gram, respectively, and a total carbon dioxide storage capacity of 2870 milligrams per gram. The volume-specific internal surface area of MOF-210 (2060 square meters per cubic centimeter) is equivalent to the outer surface of nanoparticles (3-nanometer cubes) and near the ultimate adsorption limit for solid materials.
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            The pervasive chemistry of metal-organic frameworks.

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              Large breathing effects in three-dimensional porous hybrid matter: facts, analyses, rules and consequences.

              This critical review focuses on a strange behaviour of crystallized solid matter: its reversible swelling with large magnitude. This will be of interest for experts in porous solids but also for solid state chemists and physicists. Some examples, classified according to the dimensionality of the inorganic subnetwork, present the general requirements and the structural rules which govern the existence of this phenomenon. Its consequences concern specific applications related to sensors, energy savings, sustainable development and health (100 references).
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Nature Materials
                Nature Mater
                Springer Science and Business Media LLC
                1476-1122
                1476-4660
                August 2012
                June 3 2012
                August 2012
                : 11
                : 8
                : 710-716
                Article
                10.1038/nmat3343
                22660661
                © 2012

                http://www.springer.com/tdm

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