1
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Systematics, Phylogeny, and Evolution of Braconid Wasps: 30 Years of Progress

      1 , 2 , 3 , 4

      Annual Review of Entomology

      Annual Reviews

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          The parasitoid wasp family Braconidae is likely the second-most species-rich family in the animal kingdom. Braconid wasps are widely distributed and often encountered. They constitute one of the principal groups of natural enemies of phytophagous insects, of which many are serious pest species. The enormous biological diversification of braconid wasps has led to many homoplasies, which contributed widely to instabilities in historical classifications. Recent studies using combinations of genetic markers or total mitochondrial genomes allow for better founded groupings and will ultimately lead to a stable classification. We present the current status of the phylogenetics of the Braconidae in a historical perspective and our understanding of the effects on higher classification.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 92

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Evolution of developmental strategies in parasitic hymenoptera.

          Parasitoid wasps have evolved a wide spectrum of developmental interactions with hosts. In this review we synthesize and interpret results from the phylogenetic, ecological, physiological, and molecular literature to identify factors that have influenced the evolution of parasitoid developmental strategies. We first discuss the origins and radiation of the parasitoid lifestyle in the Hymenoptera. We then summarize how parasitoid developmental strategies are affected by ecological interactions and assess the inventory of physiological and molecular traits parasitoids use to successfully exploit hosts. Last, we discuss how certain parasitoid virulence genes have evolved and how these changes potentially affect parasitoid-host interactions. The combination of phylogenetic data with comparative and functional genomics offers new avenues for understanding the evolution of biological diversity in this group of insects.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: found
            Is Open Access

            Impacts of neonicotinoid use on long-term population changes in wild bees in England

            Wild bee declines have been ascribed in part to neonicotinoid insecticides. While short-term laboratory studies on commercially bred species (principally honeybees and bumblebees) have identified sub-lethal effects, there is no strong evidence linking these insecticides to losses of the majority of wild bee species. We relate 18 years of UK national wild bee distribution data for 62 species to amounts of neonicotinoid use in oilseed rape. Using a multi-species dynamic Bayesian occupancy analysis, we find evidence of increased population extinction rates in response to neonicotinoid seed treatment use on oilseed rape. Species foraging on oilseed rape benefit from the cover of this crop, but were on average three times more negatively affected by exposure to neonicotinoids than non-crop foragers. Our results suggest that sub-lethal effects of neonicotinoids could scale up to cause losses of bee biodiversity. Restrictions on neonicotinoid use may reduce population declines.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Life-history strategies in parasitoid wasps: a comparative analysis of 'ovigeny'

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Annual Review of Entomology
                Annu. Rev. Entomol.
                Annual Reviews
                0066-4170
                1545-4487
                January 07 2019
                January 07 2019
                : 64
                : 1
                : 335-358
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Institute of Insect Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China;
                [2 ]Ministry of Agriculture Key Laboratory of Molecular Biology of Crop Pathogens and Insect Pests, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China
                [3 ]State Key Laboratory of Rice Biology, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China
                [4 ]Department of Terrestrial Zoology, Naturalis Biodiversity Center, 2300 RA Leiden, The Netherlands;
                Article
                10.1146/annurev-ento-011118-111856
                © 2019

                Comments

                Comment on this article