0
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      DNA Computation-Modulated Self-Assembly of Stimuli-Responsive Plasmonic Nanogap Antennas for Correlated Multiplexed Molecular Imaging

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references31

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Single-molecule strong coupling at room temperature in plasmonic nanocavities

          Emitters placed in an optical cavity experience an environment that changes their coupling to light. In the weak-coupling regime light extraction is enhanced, but more profound effects emerge in the single-molecule strong-coupling regime where mixed light-matter states form1,2. Individual two-level emitters in such cavities become non-linear for single photons, forming key building blocks for quantum information systems as well as ultra-low power switches and lasers3–6. Such cavity quantum electrodynamics has until now been the preserve of low temperatures and complex fabrication, severely compromising their use5,7,8. Here, by scaling the cavity volume below 40 nm3 and using host-guest chemistry to align 1-10 protectively-isolated methylene-blue molecules, we reach the strong-coupling regime at room temperature and in ambient conditions. Dispersion curves from >50 plasmonic nanocavities display characteristic anticrossings, with Rabi frequencies of 300 meV for 10 molecules decreasing to 90 meV for single molecules, matching quantitative models. Statistical analysis of vibrational spectroscopy time-series and dark-field scattering spectra provide evidence of single-molecule strong coupling. This dressing of molecules with light can modify photochemistry, opening up the exploration of complex natural processes such as photosynthesis9 and pathways towards manipulation of chemical bonds10.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Large single-molecule fluorescence enhancements produced by a bowtie nanoantenna

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Nanogap-engineerable Raman-active nanodumbbells for single-molecule detection.

              Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-based signal amplification and detection methods using plasmonic nanostructures have been widely investigated for imaging and sensing applications. However, SERS-based molecule detection strategies have not been practically useful because there is no straightforward method to synthesize and characterize highly sensitive SERS-active nanostructures with sufficiently high yield and efficiency, which results in an extremely low cross-section area in Raman sensing. Here, we report a high-yield synthetic method for SERS-active gold-silver core-shell nanodumbbells, where the gap between two nanoparticles and the Raman-dye position and environment can be engineered on the nanoscale. Atomic-force-microscope-correlated nano-Raman measurements of individual dumbbell structures demonstrate that Raman signals can be repeatedly detected from single-DNA-tethered nanodumbbells. These programmed nanostructure fabrication and single-DNA detection strategies open avenues for the high-yield synthesis of optically active smart nanoparticles and structurally reproducible nanostructure-based single-molecule detection and bioassays.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                Analytical Chemistry
                Anal. Chem.
                American Chemical Society (ACS)
                0003-2700
                1520-6882
                December 06 2022
                November 21 2022
                December 06 2022
                : 94
                : 48
                : 16887-16893
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Key Laboratory of Optic-electric Sensing and Analytical Chemistry for Life Science, MOE; College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266042, P. R. China
                Article
                10.1021/acs.analchem.2c04051
                6a539d2c-7115-4b84-b25a-e45bdcdb0a84
                © 2022

                https://doi.org/10.15223/policy-029

                https://doi.org/10.15223/policy-037

                https://doi.org/10.15223/policy-045

                History

                Comments

                Comment on this article