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      Renal Transplantation in Augmented Bladders

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      Current Urology Reports

      Springer Nature

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          Most cited references 22

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          Regenerative medicine strategies.

           Anthony Atala (2012)
          Applications of regenerative medicine technology may offer novel therapies for patients with injuries, end-stage organ failure, or other clinical problems. Currently, patients suffering from diseased and injured organs can be treated with transplanted organs. However, there is a severe shortage of donor organs that is worsening yearly as the population ages and new cases of organ failure increase. Scientists in the field of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering are now applying the principles of cell transplantation, material science, and bioengineering to construct biological substitutes that will restore and maintain normal function in diseased and injured tissues. The stem cell field is also advancing rapidly, opening new avenues for this type of therapy. For example, therapeutic cloning and cellular reprogramming may one day provide a potentially limitless source of cells for tissue engineering applications. While stem cells are still in the research phase, some therapies arising from tissue engineering endeavors have already entered the clinical setting successfully, indicating the promise regenerative medicine holds for the future. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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            Long-term followup of newborns with myelodysplasia and normal urodynamic findings: Is followup necessary?

            A subset of newborns with myelodysplasia have normal bladder function on urodynamic assessment. We analyzed long-term followup in this population to determine the necessity for subsequent urological surveillance. We retrospectively analyzed the records of 25 of 204 newborns (12%) with myelodysplasia in whom neurourological evaluation was normal after surgical repair of the spinal defect. Initial assessment included complete urodynamic study, renal ultrasound, urinalysis and urine culture. These patients were reevaluated every 3 months until age 3 years, semiannually until age 6 years and yearly thereafter. The longest followup was 18.6 years. Of the 25 newborns 22 had myelomeningocele and 3 had meningocele. During a mean followup of 9.1 years urodynamics subsequently showed neurourological deterioration in 8 children (32%). No changes in urodynamics were observed in any patient older than 6 years. All children with neurourological deterioration underwent magnetic resonance imaging, which confirmed a tethered spinal cord that was then surgically corrected. After the untethering procedure 2 patients (25%) regained normal voiding function, whereas in 6 (75%) mild or moderate neurogenic bladder dysfunction persisted. Newborns with myelodysplasia and initially normal urodynamic studies are at risk for neurological deterioration secondary to spinal cord tethering, especially during the first 6 years of life. Close followup of these children is important for the early diagnosis and timely surgical correction of tethered spinal cord, and for the prevention of progressive urinary tract deterioration.
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              Kidney transplant ureteroneocystostomy techniques and complications: review of the literature.

              Despite a variety of urinary tract reconstructive techniques, urinary complications are the most frequent technical adverse event following renal transplantation. These complications can be associated with substantial morbidity and generate excess cost. In this review we comprehensively discuss 4 techniques of ureteroneocystostomy, compare complications, and evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of each technique focusing on 4 specific urologic complications: urine leak, ureteric obstruction, hematuria, and symptomatic vesicoureteral reflux.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Current Urology Reports
                Curr Urol Rep
                Springer Nature
                1527-2737
                1534-6285
                August 2014
                June 12 2014
                August 2014
                : 15
                : 8
                Article
                10.1007/s11934-014-0431-4
                © 2014
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