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      Build it and they will come: grasshoppers check-in to a grassland bee hotel

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      Journal of Orthoptera Research

      Pensoft Publishers

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          Abstract

          A five-floor bee hotel was constructed using wooden pallets in an area of urban grassland in Ipswich, United Kingdom. Within one month of construction, two grasshopper species were observed using the hotel, with nymphs in shaded, uncut grass at the base, while adults were observed on all five floors and the roof. On the fourth floor, a stridulating field grasshopper, Chorthippusbrunneus, was sighted on two separate occasions. Further research is required to determine whether bee hotels may be an effective ‘shade’ refuge for grasshoppers in open grassland, while also providing an effective platform for stridulation.

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          Urban domestic gardens (II): experimental tests of methods for increasing biodiversity

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            ‘Bee Hotels’ as Tools for Native Pollinator Conservation: A Premature Verdict?

            Society is increasingly concerned with declining wild bee populations. Although most bees nest in the ground, considerable effort has centered on installing ‘bee hotels’—also known as nest boxes or trap nests—which artificially aggregate nest sites of above ground nesting bees. Campaigns to ‘save the bees’ often promote these devices despite the absence of data indicating they have a positive effect. From a survey of almost 600 bee hotels set up over a period of three years in Toronto, Canada, introduced bees nested at 32.9% of sites and represented 24.6% of more than 27,000 total bees and wasps recorded (47.1% of all bees recorded). Native bees were parasitized more than introduced bees and females of introduced bee species provisioned nests with significantly more female larva each year. Native wasps were significantly more abundant than both native and introduced bees and occupied almost 3/4 of all bee hotels each year; further, introduced wasps were the only group to significantly increase in relative abundance year over year. More research is needed to elucidate the potential pitfalls and benefits of using bee hotels in the conservation and population dynamics of wild native bees.
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              Does microclimate affect grasshopper populations after cutting of hay in improved grassland?

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Orthoptera Research
                JOR
                Pensoft Publishers
                1937-2426
                1082-6467
                October 03 2018
                October 03 2018
                : 27
                : 2
                : 159-161
                Article
                10.3897/jor.27.28385
                © 2018

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