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      Cryptic species diversity in a widespread bumble bee complex revealed using mitochondrial DNA RFLPs

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          MrBayes bayesian phylogenetic inference under mixed models

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            Cryptic species as a window on diversity and conservation.

            The taxonomic challenge posed by cryptic species (two or more distinct species classified as a single species) has been recognized for nearly 300 years, but the advent of relatively inexpensive and rapid DNA sequencing has given biologists a new tool for detecting and differentiating morphologically similar species. Here, we synthesize the literature on cryptic and sibling species and discuss trends in their discovery. However, a lack of systematic studies leaves many questions open, such as whether cryptic species are more common in particular habitats, latitudes or taxonomic groups. The discovery of cryptic species is likely to be non-random with regard to taxon and biome and, hence, could have profound implications for evolutionary theory, biogeography and conservation planning.
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              Population size does not influence mitochondrial genetic diversity in animals.

              Within-species genetic diversity is thought to reflect population size, history, ecology, and ability to adapt. Using a comprehensive collection of polymorphism data sets covering approximately 3000 animal species, we show that the widely used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) marker does not reflect species abundance or ecology: mtDNA diversity is not higher in invertebrates than in vertebrates, in marine than in terrestrial species, or in small than in large organisms. Nuclear loci, in contrast, fit these intuitive expectations. The unexpected mitochondrial diversity distribution is explained by recurrent adaptive evolution, challenging the neutral theory of molecular evolution and questioning the relevance of mtDNA in biodiversity and conservation studies.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Conservation Genetics
                Conserv Genet
                Springer Nature
                1566-0621
                1572-9737
                June 2008
                August 2007
                : 9
                : 3
                : 653-666
                Article
                10.1007/s10592-007-9394-z
                © 2008
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