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      Is 2+2=4? Meta-analyses of brain areas needed for numbers and calculations.

      1 ,
      NeuroImage
      Elsevier BV

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          Abstract

          Most of us use numbers daily for counting, estimating quantities or formal mathematics, yet despite their importance our understanding of the brain correlates of these processes is still evolving. A neurofunctional model of mental arithmetic, proposed more than a decade ago, stimulated a substantial body of research in this area. Using quantitative meta-analyses of fMRI studies we identified brain regions concordant among studies that used number and calculation tasks. These tasks elicited activity in a set of common regions such as the inferior parietal lobule; however, the regions in which they differed were most notable, such as distinct areas of prefrontal cortices for specific arithmetic operations. Given the current knowledge, we propose an updated topographical brain atlas of mental arithmetic with improved interpretative power.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Neuroimage
          NeuroImage
          Elsevier BV
          1095-9572
          1053-8119
          Feb 01 2011
          : 54
          : 3
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Diagnostic Imaging and Research Institute, Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. marie.arsalidou@gmail.com
          Article
          S1053-8119(10)01301-7
          10.1016/j.neuroimage.2010.10.009
          20946958
          6aa9595d-3708-4d15-bbd8-3ed57f323a94
          Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
          History

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