5
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Are laboratory parameter (biomarker) values similar to the healthy volunteer reference range in all patient populations?

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Background

          Liver biomarkers alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and bilirubin in patients with hepatitis are above the healthy volunteer reference range (HVRR) at baseline (prior to receiving the clinical trial medication). Discussions continue as how to best distinguish drug-induced liver injury in patients with abnormal baseline values participating in clinical trials. This study investigated if other baseline routine clinical safety biomarkers (lab parameters) are different from the HVRR.

          Materials and methods

          Clinical trial data (TransCelerate dataset) from placebo and standard of care treated patients were compared to the HVRR using a 10% threshold above or below the HVRR to classify a lab parameter in a patient population as potentially different from the HVRR at baseline. The TransCelerate dataset, batch 4, contained data from patients with Alzheimer’s, asthma, COPD, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, hidradenitis, hypercholesterolemia, rheumatoid arthritis, schizophrenia, stroke, and ulcerative colitis. A subset of the 200 biomarkers in Trans-Celerate were evaluated in this pilot: glucose, platelet count, neutrophil count, ALT, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and bilirubin.

          Results

          Glucose was potentially higher than the HVRR in patients with diabetes, COPD, cardiovascular disease, hypercholesterolemia, and schizophrenia. At least one or more of the hematology and hepatic biomarkers were different from the HVRR in at least one patient population, except bilirubin. All the patient populations, except Alzheimer’s and asthma, had at least one biomarker that was higher than the HVRR.

          Summary

          The routine biomarkers evaluated in this pilot study demonstrated that not all lab parameters in patient populations are similar to the HVRR. Further efforts are needed to determine which biomarkers are different from the HVRR and how to evaluate the biomarkers in patient populations for detecting drug-induced altered lab values in clinical trials.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 12

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: found
          Is Open Access

          Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and glucose metabolism: a bitter sweet symphony

          Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus are common and underdiagnosed medical conditions. It was predicted that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease will be the third leading cause of death worldwide by 2020. The healthcare burden of this disease is even greater if we consider the significant impact of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease on the cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease may be considered as a novel risk factor for new onset type 2 diabetes mellitus via multiple pathophysiological alterations such as: inflammation and oxidative stress, insulin resistance, weight gain and alterations in metabolism of adipokines. On the other hand, diabetes may act as an independent factor, negatively affecting pulmonary structure and function. Diabetes is associated with an increased risk of pulmonary infections, disease exacerbations and worsened COPD outcomes. On the top of that, coexistent OSA may increase the risk for type 2 DM in some individuals. The current scientific data necessitate a greater outlook on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease may be viewed as a risk factor for the new onset type 2 diabetes mellitus. Conversely, both types of diabetes mellitus should be viewed as strong contributing factors for the development of obstructive lung disease. Such approach can potentially improve the outcomes and medical control for both conditions, and, thus, decrease the healthcare burden of these major medical problems.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Improved nonalcoholic steatohepatitis after 48 weeks of treatment with the PPAR-gamma ligand rosiglitazone.

            Insulin resistance (IR) commonly is associated with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). To establish whether IR causes NASH, this study was undertaken to determine if improving IR would improve the histologic features that define NASH. Thirty adults with prior biopsy evidence of NASH were enrolled to receive rosiglitazone, 4 mg twice daily for 48 weeks. All patients were overweight (body mass index [BMI] > 25 kg/m(2)) and 23% were severely obese (BMI > 35 kg/m(2)); 50% had impaired glucose tolerance or diabetes. Liver biopsy specimens were obtained before beginning treatment and at treatment completion. Twenty-six patients had posttreatment biopsies; of these, 22 had initial protocol liver biopsies that met published criteria for NASH on subsequent blinded evaluation. Within this initial NASH group, the mean global necroinflammatory score significantly improved with treatment and biopsies of 10 patients (45%) no longer met published criteria for NASH after treatment. Significant improvement in hepatocellular ballooning and zone 3 perisinusoidal fibrosis also occurred. Five patients withdrew early; the 25 patients completing 48 weeks of treatment had significantly improved insulin sensitivity and mean serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels (104 initially, 42 U/L at the end of treatment). Adverse effects led to withdrawal of 3 patients (10%). Weight gain occurred in 67% of patients and the median weight increase was 7.3%. Within 6 months of completing treatment, liver enzyme levels had increased to near pretreatment levels. In conclusion, improving insulin sensitivity with rosiglitazone resulted in improved histologic markers of NASH, an observation suggesting that insulin resistance contributes to its development and that improving insulin sensitivity may be important in treating this liver disease.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Elevated Liver Function Tests in Type 2 Diabetes

               E. Harris (2005)
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Drug Des Devel Ther
                Drug Des Devel Ther
                Drug Design, Development and Therapy
                Drug Design, Development and Therapy
                Dove Medical Press
                1177-8881
                2018
                06 September 2018
                : 12
                : 2757-2773
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Patient Safety, Safety Science, AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals, Gaithersburg, MD, USA, david.brott@ 123456astrazeneca.com
                [2 ]Patient Safety, Safety Science, AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals, Webel, Germany
                [3 ]Patient Safety, Safety Science, AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals, Gothenburg, Sweden
                Author notes
                Correspondence: David A Brott, AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals, 1 MedImmune Way, Gaithersburg, MD 20878, USA, Tel +1 301 398 0275, Email david.brott@ 123456astrazeneca.com
                Article
                dddt-12-2757
                10.2147/DDDT.S173671
                6132491
                © 2018 Brott et al. This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited

                The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed.

                Categories
                Original Research

                Comments

                Comment on this article