10
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      A review of diapause and tolerance to extreme temperatures in dermestids (Coleoptera)

      , , ,
      Journal of Stored Products Research
      Elsevier BV

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references91

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          Principles of Insect Cold-Hardiness

          R. W. Salt (1961)
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Biorational approaches to managing stored-product insects.

            Stored-product insects can cause postharvest losses, estimated from up to 9% in developed countries to 20% or more in developing countries. There is much interest in alternatives to conventional insecticides for controlling stored-product insects because of insecticide loss due to regulatory action and insect resistance, and because of increasing consumer demand for product that is free of insects and insecticide residues. Sanitation is perhaps the first line of defense for grain stored at farms or elevators and for food-processing and warehouse facilities. Some of the most promising biorational management tools for farm-stored grain are temperature management and use of natural enemies. New tools for computer-assisted decision-making and insect sampling at grain elevators appear most promising. Processing facilities and warehouses usually rely on trap captures for decision-making, a process that needs further research to optimize.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Alternatives to methyl bromide treatments for stored-product and quarantine insects.

              Methyl bromide is used to control insects as a space fumigant in flour and feed mills and ship holds, as a product fumigant for some fruit and cereals, and for general quarantine purposes. Methyl bromide acts rapidly, controlling insects in less than 48 h in space fumigations, and it has a wide spectrum of activity, controlling not only insects but also nematodes and plant-pathogenic microbes. This chemical will be banned in 2005 in developed countries, except for exceptional quarantine purposes, because it depletes ozone in the atmosphere. Many alternatives have been tested as replacements for methyl bromide, from physical control methods such as heat, cold, and sanitation to fumigant replacements such as phosphine, sulfuryl fluoride, and carbonyl sulfide, among others. Individual situations will require their own type of pest control techniques, but the most promising include integrated pest management tactics and combinations of treatments such as phosphine, carbon dioxide, and heat.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Stored Products Research
                Journal of Stored Products Research
                Elsevier BV
                0022474X
                July 2016
                July 2016
                : 68
                :
                : 50-62
                Article
                10.1016/j.jspr.2016.04.004
                6b375f11-6c7d-4f29-b5d3-a06e8bf52aa6
                © 2016
                History

                Comments

                Comment on this article