36
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Exploratory structural equation modeling: an integration of the best features of exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis.

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), path analysis, and structural equation modeling (SEM) have long histories in clinical research. Although CFA has largely superseded EFA, CFAs of multidimensional constructs typically fail to meet standards of good measurement: goodness of fit, measurement invariance, lack of differential item functioning, and well-differentiated factors in support of discriminant validity. Part of the problem is undue reliance on overly restrictive CFAs in which each item loads on only one factor. Exploratory SEM (ESEM), an overarching integration of the best aspects of CFA/SEM and traditional EFA, provides confirmatory tests of a priori factor structures, relations between latent factors and multigroup/multioccasion tests of full (mean structure) measurement invariance. It incorporates all combinations of CFA factors, ESEM factors, covariates, grouping/multiple-indicator multiple-cause (MIMIC) variables, latent growth, and complex structures that typically have required CFA/SEM. ESEM has broad applicability to clinical studies that are not appropriately addressed either by traditional EFA or CFA/SEM.

          Related collections

          Author and article information

          Journal
          Annu Rev Clin Psychol
          Annual review of clinical psychology
          Annual Reviews
          1548-5951
          1548-5943
          2014
          : 10
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Department of Education, University of Western Sydney, Penrith NSW 2751, Australia; email: h.marsh@uws.edu.au.
          Article
          10.1146/annurev-clinpsy-032813-153700
          24313568
          6b6c1367-cc73-4227-ad80-eaf1361cc071
          History

          Comments

          Comment on this article