Blog
About

1
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      A Dense Fibrillar Collagen Scaffold Differentially Modulates Secretory Function of iPSC-Derived Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells to Promote Wound Healing

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          The application of human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) to generate vascular smooth muscle cells (hiPSC-VSMCs) in abundance is a promising strategy for vascular regeneration. While hiPSC-VSMCs have already been utilized for tissue-engineered vascular grafts and disease modeling, there is a lack of investigations exploring their therapeutic secretory factors. The objective of this manuscript was to understand how the biophysical property of a collagen-based scaffold dictates changes in the secretory function of hiPSC-VSMCs while developing hiPSC-VSMC-based therapy for durable regenerative wound healing. We investigated the effect of collagen fibrillar density (CFD) on hiPSC-VSMC’s paracrine secretion and cytokines via the construction of varying density of collagen scaffolds. Our study demonstrated that CFD is a key scaffold property that modulates the secretory function of hiPSC-VSMCs. This study lays the foundation for developing collagen-based scaffold materials for the delivery of hiPSC-VSMCs to promote regenerative healing through guiding paracrine signaling pathways.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 49

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          A human iPSC model of Hutchinson Gilford Progeria reveals vascular smooth muscle and mesenchymal stem cell defects.

          The segmental premature aging disease Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria syndrome (HGPS) is caused by a truncated and farnesylated form of Lamin A called progerin. HGPS affects mesenchymal lineages, including the skeletal system, dermis, and vascular smooth muscle (VSMC). To understand the underlying molecular pathology of HGPS, we derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from HGPS dermal fibroblasts. The iPSCs were differentiated into neural progenitors, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, VSMCs, and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Progerin levels were highest in MSCs, VSMCs, and fibroblasts, in that order, with these lineages displaying increased DNA damage, nuclear abnormalities, and HGPS-VSMC accumulating numerous calponin-staining inclusion bodies. Both HGPS-MSC and -VSMC viability was compromised by stress and hypoxia in vitro and in vivo (MSC). Because MSCs reside in low oxygen niches in vivo, we propose that, in HGPS, this causes additional depletion of the MSC pool responsible for replacing differentiated cells lost to progerin toxicity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Role of the extracellular matrix in regulating stem cell fate.

            The field of stem cells and regenerative medicine offers considerable promise as a means of delivering new treatments for a wide range of diseases. In order to maximize the effectiveness of cell-based therapies - whether stimulating expansion of endogenous cells or transplanting cells into patients - it is essential to understand the environmental (niche) signals that regulate stem cell behaviour. One of those signals is from the extracellular matrix (ECM). New technologies have offered insights into how stem cells sense signals from the ECM and how they respond to these signals at the molecular level, which ultimately regulate their fate.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Mechanical forces direct stem cell behaviour in development and regeneration

              Stem cells and their local microenvironment, or niche, communicate through mechanical cues to regulate cell fate and cell behaviour and to guide developmental processes. During embryonic development, mechanical forces are involved in patterning and organogenesis. The physical environment of pluripotent stem cells regulates their self-renewal and differentiation. Mechanical and physical cues are also important in adult tissues, where adult stem cells require physical interactions with the extracellular matrix to maintain their potency. In vitro, synthetic models of the stem cell niche can be used to precisely control and manipulate the biophysical and biochemical properties of the stem cell microenvironment and to examine how the mode and magnitude of mechanical cues, such as matrix stiffness or applied forces, direct stem cell differentiation and function. Fundamental insights into the mechanobiology of stem cells also inform the design of artificial niches to support stem cells for regenerative therapies.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Cells
                Cells
                cells
                Cells
                MDPI
                2073-4409
                14 April 2020
                April 2020
                : 9
                : 4
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Section of Plastic Surgery, Department of Surgery Yale School of Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06510, USA; hassan.peyvandi@ 123456gmail.com (H.P.); kaiti.duan@ 123456yale.edu (K.D.); james.nie@ 123456yale.edu (J.N.)
                [2 ]Vascular Biology and Therapeutics Program and the Department of Surgery, Yale School of Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06510, USA; ocean.setia@ 123456yale.edu (O.S.); jolanta.gorecka@ 123456yale.edu (J.G.); laraminchillo@ 123456gmail.com (L.L.); alan.dardik@ 123456yale.edu (A.D.)
                [3 ]Department of Biomedical Engineering, Rutgers University, The State University New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA; fberthia@ 123456soe.rutgers.edu
                Author notes
                [* ]Correspondence: biraja.dash@ 123456yale.edu (B.C.D.); henry.hsia@ 123456yale.edu (H.C.H.); Tel.: +1-203-737-2049 (B.C.D.); Fax: +1-203-785-5714 (H.C.H.)
                Article
                cells-09-00966
                10.3390/cells9040966
                7226960
                32295218
                © 2020 by the authors.

                Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

                Categories
                Article

                Comments

                Comment on this article