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      Molecular Analysis of X-Linked Ichthyosis in Japan

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          Abstract

          Background: X-linked ichthyosis (XLI) is an inherited skin disorder caused by a deficiency of steroid sulfatase (STS). The gene and protein of STS were examined in 19 Japanese patients with XLI. Results: In Western blotting analysis, no cross-reacting peptide was detected in the patients’ placenta, although a single band (63 kD) corresponding to STS in a normal subject was observed. Southern blotting was performed using EcoRI digests of cellular DNA from 13 XLI patients and full-length human STS cDNA as a probe. Normal males had bands of 20, 15, 10, 9.0, 6.1, 4.2, 2.6, and 1.5 kb. Twelve of the 19 patients had only 20- and 1.5-kb bands. Only one patient had the same band pattern as that of normal males. The STS gene was analyzed by PCR in 6 of the 19 patients. PCR amplification products were sequenced to analyze the STS gene. Two cases with one-base change in the STS gene and variation in amino acids H444R and E560P were found. Mutant STS cDNA was transfected into COS-1 cells and the STS enzyme activity was assayed. The enzyme activities were less than the minimum detection value of the detection system. Conclusions: These results suggest that XLI is mainly caused by an extensive deletion of the STS gene and that the PCR method is useful for detection of STS point mutations.

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          Most cited references 5

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          Cloning and expression of steroid sulfatase cDNA and the frequent occurrence of deletions in STS deficiency: implications for X-Y interchange.

          Human STS is a microsomal enzyme important in steroid metabolism. The gene encoding STS is pseudoautosomal in the mouse but not in humans, and escapes X inactivation in both species. We have prepared monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies to the protein which has been purified and from which partial amino acid sequence data have been obtained. cDNA clones containing the entire coding sequence were isolated, sequenced, and expressed in heterologous cells. Variable length transcripts have been shown to be present and due to usage of alternative poly(A) addition sites. The functional gene maps to Xp22.3-Xpter and there is a pseudogene on Yq suggesting a recent pericentric inversion. Absence of STS enzymatic activity occurs frequently in human populations and produces a visible phenotype of scaly skin or ichthyosis. Ten patients with inherited STS deficiency were studied and eight had complete gene deletions. The possibility that STS deficiency results from aberrant X-Y interchange is discussed.
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            Differential diagnosis and management of very low second trimester maternal serum unconjugated estriol levels, with special emphasis on the diagnosis of X‐linked ichthyosis

             Y Zalel,  I Kedar,  R TEPPER (1996)
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              Characterization of Point Mutations in Patients with X-linked Ichthyosis

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                HRE
                Horm Res Paediatr
                10.1159/issn.1663-2818
                Hormone Research in Paediatrics
                S. Karger AG
                1663-2818
                1663-2826
                2001
                2001
                14 March 2002
                : 56
                : 5-6
                : 182-187
                Affiliations
                Departments of aBiochemistry, and bObstetrics and Gynecology, Hokkaido University School of Medicine, Sapporo, Japan
                Article
                48116 Horm Res 2001;56:182–187
                10.1159/000048116
                11910205
                © 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

                Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

                Page count
                Figures: 4, Tables: 2, References: 22, Pages: 6
                Categories
                Original Paper

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