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      New developments in acne treatment: role of combination adapalene–benzoylperoxide

      ,

      Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management

      Dove Medical Press

      adapalene, benzoylperoxide, acne vulgaris, treatment

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          Abstract

          The fixed-dose combination adapalene 0.1%/benzoylperoxide 2.5% (A/BPO) was introduced as an acne vulgaris therapeutic in 2007. It combines anti-inflammatory, keratolytic, comedolytic, and antibacterial properties. Thus, it addresses several pathophysiological factors involved in the pathophysiology of acne. This review highlights the rationale for the use of this fixed-dose combination product, its therapeutic efficacy including effects on adherence and quality of life, its use for different forms of acne, and the side-effect profile. In summary, the fixed-dose combination of A/BPO gel can be regarded as a highly effective and safe formulation. It is not associated with antibiotic resistance. It reduces factors that cause nonadherence and has positive effects on the quality of life of affected patients. The tolerance is good. The initial mild irritation potential can be addressed by adequate counseling. A/BPO can be used for all forms of inflammatory acne, including severe forms, as part of a combination with systemic antibiotics. Finally, it can also be used for the long-term treatment of chronic acne. Thus, it is a very valuable therapeutic option in daily practice, which is reflected by its strong recommendation in the “European S3-guidelines”.

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          Most cited references 48

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          Management of acne: a report from a Global Alliance to Improve Outcomes in Acne.

           J Leyden,  ,  Andrew Y Finlay (2003)
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            New insights into the management of acne: an update from the Global Alliance to Improve Outcomes in Acne group.

            The Global Alliance to Improve Outcomes in Acne published recommendations for the management of acne as a supplement to the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology in 2003. The recommendations incorporated evidence-based strategies when possible and the collective clinical experience of the group when evidence was lacking. This update reviews new information about acne pathophysiology and treatment-such as lasers and light therapy-and relevant topics where published data were sparse in 2003 but are now available including combination therapy, revision of acne scarring, and maintenance therapy. The update also includes a new way of looking at acne as a chronic disease, a discussion of the changing role of antibiotics in acne management as a result of concerns about microbial resistance, and factors that affect adherence to acne treatments. Summary statements and recommendations are provided throughout the update along with an indication of the level of evidence that currently supports each finding. As in the original supplement, the authors have based recommendations on published evidence as much as possible.
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              Suicidal ideation, mental health problems, and social impairment are increased in adolescents with acne: a population-based study.

              We performed a cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study to explore the relationship of suicidal ideation, mental health problems, and social functioning to acne severity among adolescents aged 18-19 years. A total of 4,744 youth were invited and 3,775 (80%) participated. In all, 14% reported having substantial acne (a lot and very much). Among those with very much acne, as compared those with no/little acne, suicidal ideation was twice as frequently reported among girls (25.5 vs. 11.9%) and three times more frequently reported among boys (22.6 vs. 6.3%). Suicidal ideation remained significantly associated with substantial acne (odds ratio 1.80, 95% confidence interval 1.30-2.50) in a multivariate model including adjustments of symptoms of depression, ethnicity, and family income. Mental health problems, as assessed by the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (2.25, 1.69-3.00), low attachment to friends (1.52, 1.21-1.91), not thriving at school (1.41, 1.12-1.78), never having had a romantic relationship (1.35, 1.05-1.70), and never having had sexual intercourse (1.51, 1.21-1.89) were all associated with substantial acne in a multivariate model. Acne is frequently found in late adolescence and is associated with social and psychological problems. Adverse events including suicidal ideation and depression that have been associated with therapies for acne may reflect the burden of substantial acne rather than the effects of medication.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Ther Clin Risk Manag
                Ther Clin Risk Manag
                Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management
                Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management
                Dove Medical Press
                1176-6336
                1178-203X
                2016
                03 October 2016
                : 12
                : 1497-1506
                Affiliations
                Clinic for Dermatology, Venereology, and Allergology, University Hospital, Frankfurt/M, Germany
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Falk R Ochsendorf, Clinic for Dermatology, Venereology, and Allergology, University Hospital, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, Frankfurt/M 60590, Germany, Tel +49 69 6301 6661, Fax +49 69 6301 5117, Email ochsendorf@ 123456em.uni-frankfurt.de
                Article
                tcrm-12-1497
                10.2147/TCRM.S94062
                5055040
                © 2016 Kim and Ochsendorf. This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited

                The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed.

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                Review

                Medicine

                treatment, acne vulgaris, benzoylperoxide, adapalene

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